Magnitude-4.4 Earthquake Shakes Southern California Suburbs

Earthquake Dec 2015 2nd PhotoA moderate earthquake shook an inland area of Southern California near San Bernardino on Tuesday night, giving a start to thousands across a heavily populated area with more than one person comparing it to a rumbling big rig.

There were no immediate reports of damages or injuries, however.

The magnitude-4.4 quake hit in foothills northwest of San Bernardino about 5:38 p.m. at a depth of about three miles, a report from the U.S. Geological Survey said. Aftershocks of magnitude 3.8 and 3.2 came minutes later, and dozens of tiny aftershocks followed in the next few hours.

People reported feeling the earthquake throughout the suburbs east of Los Angeles, which is about 50 miles southwest of the epicenter.

Brenda Torres, 24, a waitress at Papa Tony’s Diner in San Bernardino said customers were a bit shook up but kept calm. Nothing in the restaurant rattled or broke and the quake was so short there wasn’t even time to take cover under a table.

“At first I thought it was a semi-truck that had hit the building or something,” Torres said.

Laura Melgoza, 23, a college student and cashier at WaBa Grill in San Bernardino, said she and her co-workers headed toward the front of the building as the restaurant shook.

“I was just panicking,” she said. “It was the biggest one that I’ve felt.”

Tim Franke, a dispatch supervisor with the San Bernardino County Fire Department communication center, said there were no reports of damage or injuries, but the shaking was felt “numerous times” at the department.

“It was like a big truck was coming in,” Franke said.

Police in the area also said they had no reports of problems from the quake.

The quake came near the intersection of the San Jacinto, San Andreas and Cucamonga faults, three of the largest in Southern California, but it was too small to determine which fault was responsible, the USGS said.Earthquake Dec 2015

There have been nine earthquakes above magnitude-4 In the general area in the last 10 years.

“There’s nothing particularly different about it that we can see at this point,” Lucy Jones, a USGS seismologist, told KNBC-TV.

Traditionally earthquakes of this size are a monthly occurrence in Southern California, but “it’s been quieter for the last few years,” Jones said.

There is a 5 percent chance that the quake, or any quake, is a precursor of something bigger, Jones said.

http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/magnitude-44-earthquake-shakes-southern-california-suburbs-36000705

With the recent string of earthquakes hitting Southern California, local labor law poster company All in One Posters is reminding businesses to stay prepared by developing an Earthquake Preparedness Poster. http://www.allinoneposters.com/Labor-Law-Posters/Federal-Safety-and-Specialty-Posters/Earthquake-Preparedness-English.html

Texas Concealed and Open Carry Restriction Posters

PROTECT YOUR BUSINESS!

Beginning in 2016, Texas will allow the open carrying of handguns in TX Concealed Carry Restriction Poster.gifpublic and the carrying of concealed handguns signed by Governor Greg Abbott.

As part of their efforts to prevent violence in the workplace, many employers prohibit guns on their premises. Such policies are lawful under the new open carry law, and Texas law already requires business owners that want to keep guns from their property to notify the public “orally or by written communication” that guns are prohibited on their property.

Certain locations will remain gun-free as a result of provisions in the TX Open Carry Restriction Poster.giflaw, which was signed by Texas Governor Greg Abbott: firearms are not permitted to be carried in churches, jails, hospitals, and establishments where alcohol comprises the majority of revenue.

To prohibit concealed handguns in your business, you must post signs in an obvious manner, clearly visible to the public. Gun holders who ignore those signs risk violating state trespassing laws and would face penalties and fines.

We are family—And now we have protected status

On January 1, a new law in New York will make “familial status” a protected characteristic under the state’s fair employment law. With the new law, New York joins several other states (including Alaska, Oregon, Minnesota, Pennsylvania, and the District of Columbia) that expressly prohibit an employer from discriminating against an applicant or employee because of familial status—or, in some jurisdictions—family responsibilities.

Generally, the laws prohibit discrimination against an individual Parents Giving Children Piggyback Ride Outdoorsbecause he or she is a parent of a dependent child, has legal custody of a child, or contributes to the support of a person in a dependent relationship. Although familial status discrimination is most often thought of in terms of housing discrimination claims brought by tenants or prospective tenants, it has been making inroads in the employment setting.

In 2007, the EEOC issued enforcement guidance on “Unlawful Disparate Treatment of Workers with Caregiving Responsibilities” that explained how an employment action that affects an employee who is a caregiver might unlawfully discriminate on the basis of prohibited characteristics under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII) or the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

The guidance points out that caregiver status is not a separate protected category under Title VII or the ADA, but that stereotyping and other kinds of disparate treatment in the workplace may violate the laws.

For example, let’s say an employer allows its female employees to take time off for caregiving responsibilities, but balks when male employees make similar requests. That kind of disparate treatment can get an employer into trouble because it appears to be based on the stereotype that women—but not men—are expected to provide care for family members.

An employer is also vulnerable to a sex discrimination claim if it denies a female employee a promotion because of actual or presumed caregiving responsibilities. In one case, a court allowed an employee to proceed to trial with her failure-to-promote sex discrimination lawsuit—even though the employer had promoted a female coworker to the job in question (Chadwick v. WellPoint, Inc., 561 F.3d 38 (1st Cir. 2009)).

The evidence of discrimination included comments by the interviewers about the plaintiff’s four young children. The employer pointed out that the promoted employee also had children, but the court noted the two children were older and there was no evidence the employer knew about the children at the time of the promotion decision.

Adverse employment actions based on caregiving responsibilities or family relationships can also violate the ADA. The ADA expressly prohibits employers from taking an adverse action against an employee based on the employee’s association with an individual whose disability is known to the employer.

If an employer’s assumptions or stereotyping about the negative effect of an employee’s caregiving responsibilities (actual or perceived) on the employee’s job performance result in an adverse action against the employee, that’s a violation of the ADA.

Although Title VII and the ADA do not expressly prohibit caregiver discrimination, employers should remember that they may have specific obligations to caregivers under laws like the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and state or local laws.

Many cities and counties prohibit discrimination on the basis of familial or parental status including Atlanta, Georgia; Columbus, Ohio; Madison, Wisconsin; Cook County and the city of Chicago, Illinois; and three counties in southern New York. Also, under Executive Order 13152, federal government employers are prohibited from discriminating against applicants or employees based on their status as a parent.

To avoid discrimination claims based on parenthood, familial status, or caregiving responsibilities related to protected categories, employers should make sure similarly situated employees are treated equally under the employer’s policies—e.g., same leave policies apply equally to male and female employees.

Employers should also be sure their antiharassment policies are communicated clearly to all employees and that all employees are familiar with procedures for reporting harassment

By Joan Farrell, JD, Senior Legal Editor HR.BLR.COM

Businessman and his son convicted of $300,000 embezzlement of employee wages on public works project

SANTA ANA – A Pico Rivera businessman and his son pleaded guilty on Tuesday to embezzling about $300,000 from their employees’ wages on public works jobs.

Daniel Jacob Siapin, 60, and Gabriel Daniel Siapin, 37, who both live in La Habra Heights, pleaded guilty to a court offer of 28 felony counts of taking and receiving a portion of worker’s wage on public works, and 32 felony counts of recording a false and forged instrument with a sentencing enhancement for property loss over $200,000. Daniel Siapin’s California state contractor’s license was revoked today by the court. Daniel Siapin and Gabriel Siapin are each expected to sentenced to 90 days in jail, three years formal probation, ordered to pay over $227,000 in restitution, and are prohibited from working on any other public works contracts at their sentencing on April 11, 2016, at 9:00 a.m. in Department C-57, Central Justice Center, Santa Ana.

Daniel Siapin owns a landscaping, irrigation and maintenance company that his son helps him run.

The two violated a law requiring them to provide a minimum prevailing wage to their employees on a project for Lakeside Middle School in Lakeside, according to the Orange County District Attorney’s Office.

In February 2010, the city of Los Angeles penalized their company for failing to pay prevailing wages on a public works job, according to prosecutors.

Between 2011 and February 2013, the two did not deposit about $300,000 in an account for the fringe benefits of employees on a project in Orange County and instead pocketed the money, prosecutors said.

When the two were indicted last year, prosecutors said they could face up to 24 years in prison if convicted of all the charges at trial.

Updated 2016 Massachusetts Labor Law Poster

STAY IN COMPLIANCE!

The state of Massachusetts just updated their a wage and hour postMassachusetts-Federal-Combo-Labor-Law-Poster-Englisher which reflects thew rate of $10 an hour taking effect January 1, 2016. New information regarding for Earned Income Credit, Non-Discrimination and Equal Pay was also added to the revised poster. In addition, there have been a few other changes to the poster this year such as the Unemployment Insurance Coverage, Fair Employment and new Parental leave have been updated. All of this updates is included in our 2016 poster!

You may place your order directly online, or click to download the 2016 Order Form which you may return to us via email, postal mail, or fax at (714) 521-7728. For more information, you may contact us at (800) 273-0307 or send us an email at sales@allinoneposters.com, our knowledgeable Customer Service Team will readily assist you.

Updated 2016 Michigan Labor Law Poster

STAY IN COMPLIANCE!

The state of Michigan just released a new minimum wage poster that Michigan-Federal-Combo-Labor-Law-Poster-Englishtakes effect January 1, 2016. The new rate is $8.50 an hour. In addition, there have been a few other changes to the posters this year. The Michigan Safety and Health Protection on the Job has been updated to reflect the new regulations regarding reporting all work-related inpatient hospitalizations, amputations, and losses of an eye. Employers must notify the Michigan Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs within 24 hours. Both of these changes and a few other minor changes are now included in our 2016 posters!

You may place your order directly online, or click to download the 2016 Order Form which you may return to us via email, postal mail, or fax at (714) 521-7728. For more information, you may contact us at (800) 273-0307 or send us an email at sales@allinoneposters.com, our knowledgeable Customer Service Team will readily assist you.

Updated 2016 South Dakota Labor Law Poster

STAY IN COMPLIANCE!South-Dakota-Federal-Combo-Labor-Law-Poster-English

The state of South Dakota just released a new minimum wage poster that takes effect January 1, 2016. The new rate is $8.55 an hour. This new notice is included in our 2016 posters.

You may place your order directly online, or click to download the 2016 Order Form which you may return to us via email, postal mail, or fax at (714) 521-7728. For more information, you may contact us at (800) 273-0307 or send us an email at sales@allinoneposters.com, our knowledgeable Customer Service Team will readily assist you.

Updated 2016 Colorado Labor Law Poster

STAY IN COMPLIANCE!Colorado-Federal-Combo-Labor-Law-Poster-English

The state of Colorado just released a new minimum wage poster that takes effect January 1, 2016. The new rate is $8.31 an hour. This new notice is included in our 2016 posters.

You may place your order directly online, or click to download the 2016 Order Form which you may return to us via email, postal mail, or fax at (714) 521-7728. For more information, you may contact us at (800) 273-0307 or send us an email at sales@allinoneposters.com, our knowledgeable Customer Service Team will readily assist you.

Updated 2016 Minnesota Labor Law Poster

STAY IN COMPLIANCE!Minnesota-Federal-Combo-Labor-Law-Poster-English

The state of Minnesota has updated their OSHA poster. The
Minnesota Safety and Health Protection on the Job has been updated to reflect the new regulations regarding reporting all work-related inpatient hospitalizations, amputations, and losses of an eye must notify the MNOSHA within 24 hours. This change is updated on our 2016 posters!

You may place your order directly online, or click to download the 2016 Order Form which you may return to us via email, postal mail, or fax at (714) 521-7728. For more information, you may contact us at (800) 273-0307 or send us an email at sales@allinoneposters.com, our knowledgeable Customer Service Team will readily assist you.

Updated 2016 Rhode Island Labor Law Poster

STAY IN COMPLIANCE!

The state of Rhode Island just released a new minimumRhode-Island-Federal-Combo-Labor-Law-Poster-English wage poster
that takes effect January 1, 2016, which it goes up to $9.60 an hour. In addition, there have been another change to the poster this year. The Federal OSHA has also released a new poster that now replaces the previous blue and yellow “It’s The Law” notice.
You may place your order directly online, or click to download the 2016 Order Form which you may return to us via email, postal mail, or fax at (714) 521-7728. For more information, you may contact us at (800) 273-0307 or send us an email at sales@allinoneposters.com, our knowledgeable Customer Service Team will readily assist you.