Connecticut: New Laws Address Wage Payment Timing and Electronic Pay Notices

Wage Changes Affect Many Employers

New laws in Connecticut make certain changes regarding wage payment timing and electronic pay notices. Key provisions and effective dates of these laws are presented below.

Wage Payment Timing
Employers in Connecticut are generally required to pay wages weekly—or, under a new law effective as of June 6, 2016, once every two weeks—on a regular pay day which is designated in advance by the employer and not more than 8 days after the end of the pay period.

Note: The labor commissioner may, upon application, waive this requirement with respect to any particular week or weeks, and may also, upon application, permit an employer to establish regular pay periods less frequently than once every two weeks, provided each affected employee is paid in full at least once in each calendar month on a regularly established schedule.

Electronic Wage Statements

Existing law provides that with each wage payment, employers must furnish to each employee a written record of hours worked, the gross earnings showing straight time and overtime as separate entries,itemized deductions, and net earnings—except that the furnishing of arecord of hours worked and the separation of straight time and overtime do not apply in the case of any employee with respect to whom the employer is specifically exempt from the keeping of time records and the payment of overtime under state or federal law.

Under a new law effective October 1, 2016, such records may be furnished electronically—with the employee’s explicit consent. If the record of hours is furnished electronically, the employer must provide a means for each employee to securely, privately, and conveniently access and print such record. The employer must also incorporate reasonable safeguards regarding any information contained in the record furnished electronically to protect the confidentiality of an employee’s personal information.

Click here to read the text of the new law (§ 3).

ORIGINALLY POSTED BY HR360

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