E-Verify Requirement(Updated May 2016)

What is E-Verify?

The E-Verify program was created as a voluntary Internet-based pilot program to help employers verify the work authorization of new hires. It applies to U.S. citizens and noncitizens. Originally known as the Basic Pilot/Employment Eligibility Verification Program, the program was renamed E-Verify in 2007. The program is administered by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in partnership with the Social Security Administration.

What is required of federal contractors?

As of Sept. 8, 2009, federal contractors or subcontractors are required to use E-verify to determine employment eligibility of employees performing direct work on the contract and new hires. It applies to federal contracts that contain the Federal Acquisition Regulation E-Verify Clause. It exempts contracts of less than 120 days and valued at less than $100,000 and subcontracts valued at less than $3,000.

Table: States Requiring E-Verify

 

  State Citation Year Applies to:
1 Alabama H56 2011 All employers, public and private
2 Arizona HB 2779
HB 2745
2007
2008
All employers, public and private
3 Colorado HB 1343
SB139, SB193
2006
2008
All contractors with state contracts
4 Florida Executive Order 11-02

Executive Order 11-116

2011

2011

State agencies, public employers and contractors
5 Georgia SB 529
HB 2

SB 447

HB 87

2006
2009

2010

2011

Public employers, contractors, and subcontractors

Private employers more than 10 employees (phase in)

6 Idaho Executive Order 2009 State agencies and public employers
7 Indiana SB 590 2011 State agencies, public employers and contractors
8 Louisiana HB 342

HB 646

2011

2011

All state and local contractors

Private employers requires to either use E-verify or check multiple forms of identification from the new hire.

9 Michigan     Only Oakland, Macomb, and Ingham counties require public employers to use E-Verify for all new employees. Additionally, country service contractors within Oakland county must use E-Verify.
10 Minnesota   2011 All contractors with state contract worth in excess of $50,000
11 Mississippi SB 2988 2008 All employers, public and private
12 Missouri HB 1549
HB 390
2008
2009
State agencies, public employers and contractors
13 Nebraska L403 2009 State agencies, public employers and contractors
14 New York   2008 The village of Suffern, New York requires any new contractors with the village to use E-Verify for all new employees.
15 North Carolina SB 1523

HB 36

HB 318

2006

2011

2015

All contractors.

Public and private employers with more than 25 employees.

16 Oklahoma HB 1804 2007 State agencies, public employers and contractors
17 Oregon     All county employers within Columbia County
18 Pennsylvania SB 637 2011 State agencies, public employers and contractors with contracts of $25,000 or greater
19 South Carolina HB 4400

SB 20

2008

2011

All employers, public and private
20 Tennessee HB1378
SB 196
2011
2016
All private employers with more than 6 employees must use E-Verify for all new hires or use alternative methods to verify work authorization
Under the new law, employers with 50 or more employees must enroll in and use the federal E-Verify program to verify the work authorization status of employees hired on or after January 1, 2017.
21 Texas RP 80 2014 State agencies, public employers and contractors
22 Utah SB 81
SB 39

HB 251

HB 116

2008
2009

2010

2011

Public employers, contractors, subcontractors

Private employers with more than 15 employees

23 Virginia H 737

HB 1859/SB 1049

2010

2011

State agencies, public employers and contractors with at least 50 employees and a contract worth at least $50,000
24 Washington     Washington does not have a statewide E-Verify requirement. However, there are several cities and counties that have enacted their own legislation to address E-Verify; these include the cities Hoqiuam, Kennewick, Yakima, and Lakewood, as well as Clark, Cowitz, Lewis, Pierce, and Whatcom counties

taken from http://www.verifiedperson.com/products_faqs_20.html

Illinois: Hotels and Motels Must Display Human Trafficking Poster

Posters Available

Under a new law in Illinois, effective July 1, 2017, the owner of a hotel or motel must post a notice informing the public and victims of human trafficking of telephone hotline numbers to seek help or report unlawful activity.

Background
Currently, specified businesses and other establishments must post such notice in English, Spanish, and in one other language that is the most widely spoken language in the county where the establishment is located and for which translation is mandated by the federal Voting Rights Act, as applicable. These include the following:

  • On the premise consumption retailer licensees under the Liquor Control Act of 1934 where the sale of alcoholic liquor is the principal business carried on by the licensee at the premises and primary to the sale of food.
  • Adult entertainment facilities
  • Primary airports
  • Intercity passenger rail or light rail stations
  • Bus stations
  • Truck Stops. For the purposes of this Act, “truck stop” means a privately-owned and operated facility that provides food, fuel, shower or other sanitary facilities, and lawful overnight truck parking.
  • Emergency rooms within general acute care hospitals
  • Urgent Care Centers
  • Farm labor contractors
  • Privately-operated job recruitment centers

The specified business or other establishment must post the notice in a conspicuous place near the public entrance of the establishment or in another conspicuous location in clear view of the public and employees where similar notices are customarily posted. Business or establishments that are required to display this poster that fail to comply with the requirements of this act is liable for a civil penalty of $500 for a first offense and $1,000 for each subsequent offense.

 

Note: This does not require a business or other establishment in a county where a language other than English or Spanish is the most widely spoken language to print the notice in more than one language in addition to English and Spanish.

New Law 
Beginning July 1, 2017, the owner of a hotel or motel must post a notice that complies with the law in a conspicuous and accessible place in or about the premises in clear view of the employees where similar notices are customarily posted.

For the convenience of our customers, All In One Poster Company is offering a laminated 11”x17” English and Spanish Bilingual Poster to help satisfy the posting requirement. You may view the poster by clicking HERE.

The Illinois Department of Human Services offers additional languages.

Click here to read the text of the new law. For more information on the Illinois Human Trafficking Resources Center Notice Act, please click here.

Public Act 099-0099