Minimum Wage Increases Effective July 1

Minimium Wage July 2018

Minimum Wage Rates Effective July 1, 2018. This is NOT an exhaustive list, and is used for illustration purposes only.

Effective July 1, 2018, the minimum wage will increase in the following states and localities as follows. To access the actual posting requirements for each municipal or local requirement, CLICK HERE, then click on your state.

  • Maryland: $10.10 per hour (Already included in our 2018 combo poster)
  • Oregon: $10.75 per hour (Already included in our combination poster as of April 2nd 2018)
    ($12.00 per hour in the Portland metropolitan area;
    $10.50 per hour in nonurban counties)
  • District of Columbia (DC): $13.25 per hour (Already included in our 2018 combo poster)
  • Los Angeles, CA: $13.25 per hour for employers with 26 or more employees;                                             $12.00 per hour for employers with 25 or fewer employees
  • Chicago, IL: $12.00 per hour
  • Cook County, IL: $11.00 per hour
  • San Francisco, CA: $15.00 per hour
  • Minneapolis, MN: $11.25 per hour for employers with 100 or more employees;                                           $10.25 per hour for employers with 100 or fewer employees
  • Belmont, CA: $12.50 per hour
  • Emeryville, CA: $15.00 per hour
  • Malibu, CA: $13.25 per hour for employers with 26 or more employees;
    $12.00 per hour for employers with 25 or fewer employees
  • Milpitas, CA: $13.50 per hour
  • Pasadena, CA: $13.25 per hour for employers with 26 or more employees;
    $12.00 per hour for employers with 25 or fewer employees
  • San Leandro, CA: $13.00 per hour
  • Montgomery County, MD:
    • $12.25 per hour for employers with 51 or more employees;
    • $12.00 per hour for employers with 2-50 employees

Additional minimum wage rates may apply for tipped employees and in metropolitan areas. Be sure to comply with any local wage requirements that apply to your business. Updated local and municipal posters can be found here: http://www.allinoneposters.com/Specific-City-and-Industry-Notices

*Some posters may not yet be available (such as Montgomery County Maryland as of June 19, 2018)

California July 2018 Labor Law Updates

With ever-changing labor law posting requirements, and with the constant addition of new local ordinances that also require posters, we understand the difficulty in keeping up with the trend. For your convenience, All In One Posters has dedicated a page on our website that lists some of the major additional required notices arranged by state. Some are available for purchase, but most are downloadable at no cost to you. Click on the link below for further details:

http://www.allinoneposters.com/Specific-City-and-Industry-Notices *

*Updated with the latest changes that will take effect July 1st 2018 for certain California localities.

NYC Enacts New Sexual Harassment Training, Poster, and Information Sheet Requirements

New York City has enacted new sexual harassment trainingposter, and notice requirements for employers. Starting April 1, 2019, employers with 15 or more employees will be required to annually conduct anti-sexual harassment interactive training for all employees, including supervisors and managers. In addition, starting September 6, 2018, all employers will be required to:

  • Post an anti-sexual harassment rights and responsibilities poster in employee breakrooms or other common areas where employees gather; and
  • Distribute an information sheet on sexual harassment to employees at the time of hire and in the employee handbook.

The city is expected to release a model poster and information sheet soon.

Additional requirements applyClick here for more on the training requirement. Click here for more on the poster and information sheet requirements.

Posted by HR360

Pasadena California Gets Minimum Wage Increase This July 1, 2018

Beginning July 1, 2018, employers with 26 or more employees must pay wages of not less than $13.25 per hour (in addition to any tips received) to each employee. For employers with 25 or less employees, the minimum wage is $12.00 per hour.

The official posters must be posted in a conspicuous place, accessible to all employees, where the other state and federal labor law posters are also posted. They can be downloaded below:

Pasadena 25 or less

25 or less employees

Pasadena 26 or more

26 or more employees

The minimum wage requirement set forth in the Pasadena Minimum Wage Ordinance applies to adult and minor employees who work two (2) or more hours per week in Pasadena.

Under the Ordinance, employees who assert their rights to receive the City’s minimum wage are protected from retaliation. Employees may file a civil lawsuit against their employers for any violation of the Ordinance or may file a complaint with the City’s Department of Planning and Community Development. The City will investigate possible violations and, where appropriate, will obtain payroll records as provided by law, and will enforce violations of the minimum wage requirements by ordering reinstatement of employees, payment of back wages unlawfully withheld, and penalties. In addition, any business that violates the provisions of the Pasadena Minimum Wage Ordinance is subject to criminal prosecution.

 

City of Emeryville CA Minimum Wage Increase Takes Effect July 1, 2018

New Rates for Small and Large Employers

Effective July 1, 2018, the minimum wage in Emeryville, California will rise to $15.00 per hour for small businesses (55 or fewer employees) and to $15.69 per hour for large businesses (56 or more employees). Paid sick leave requirements will remain the same.

Click here for more information.

San Francisco Employers Annual Reporting Form Due April 30, 2018

Employers covered by San Francisco’s Health Care Security Ordinance (HCSO) and/or the Fair Chance Ordinance (FCO) are required to submit the 2017 Employer Annual Reporting Form to the Office of Labor Standards Enforcement by April 30, 2018.

Coverage
Employers may determine whether they are required to submit the form by filling out this survey. Employers who were not covered by the HCSO or the FCO in 2017 will be directed to a page indicating that they do not need to submit the form. Covered employers will be directed to the appropriate online form.

Covered employers should review the instructions before beginning the online form. A PDF preview of the form is also available.

Click here for additional resources on the reporting requirement.

For more information on the HCSO and FCO, employers may visit the city’s website.

Originally Posted by HR360

PHILADELPHIA’S WAGE THEFT ORDINANCE: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

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PHILADELPHIA – July 6, 2016 – Passed last fall by City Council, Philadelphia’s new ordinance to provide means and procedures for wage theft complaints took effect on July 1, 2016. Employees can now file official wage theft complaints with the City’s Wage Theft Coordinator.

wage-theft-poster-page-001-232x300

Please click here to know about the new ordinance.

 

San Francisco: Minimum Wage Rises to $13.00 Per Hour on July 1, 2016

As a reminder, the San Francisco minimum wage will rise to $13.00 per hour san-francisco-ordinances-non-laminated-minimum-wage-paid-sick-hcso-fair-chance-family-friendly-imagebeginning July 1, 2016. A new poster reflecting the updated rate (in multiple languages) is now available by clicking here.

Future Minimum Wage Increases in San Francisco
Additional raises are expected according to the following schedule:

  • $14.00 per hour beginning on July 1, 2017;
  • $15.00 per hour beginning on July 1, 2018; and
  • Increased annually by an amount corresponding to the prior year’s increase (if any) in the Consumer Price Index beginning on July 1, 2019.

Click here for more information.

ORIGINALLY POSTED BY HR360

NYC: Local Law Grants Caregivers Protections Under Nondiscrimination Law

Legislation Effective May 4, 2016

Under a new local law, the New York City Human Rights Law (NYCHRL) prohibits employment discrimination based on an individual’s actual or perceived status as a caregiver. Under the NYCHRL, employers with 4 or more employees are prohibited from discriminating against individuals on the basis of age, race, creed, color, national origin, gender, disability, pregnancy, or marital status, among other protected classes.

Under the local law, “caregiver” means a person who provides direct and ongoing care for a minor child or a care recipient.

A “care recipient” is a person with a disability who:

  • Is a covered relative, or a person who resides in the caregiver’s household; and
  • Relies on the caregiver for medical care or to meet the needs of daily living.

The local law contains additional definitions, and takes effect May 4, 2016.

Click here to read the text of the local law.

HR360 Editorial Team http://www.hr360.com

San Francisco Issues Final Rules Implementing Retail Workers’ Bill of Rights

o-san-francisco-union-square-facebook1The San Francisco Office of Labor Standards Enforcement (OLSE) has issued final rules, effective March 1, 2016, implementing the Formula Retail Employee Rights Ordinances (sometimes known as the “Retail Workers’ Bill of Rights”).

Background
The two Formula Retail Employee Rights Ordinances (effective as of July 3, 2015) regulate hours, retention, and scheduling at some “formula retail establishments.” The ordinances apply to formula retail establishments (or chain stores) with at least 40 formula retail establishments worldwide and 20 or more employees in San Francisco, as well as their janitorial and security contractors.

Final Rules and Required Notice
The final rules implementing the ordinances include details on topics such as:

  • Determining whether a formula retail establishment has 20 or more employees;
  • Overtime pay and offers of additional hours to part-time employees;
  • Calculating an employee’s “regular hourly rate” under the law; and
  • Calculating predictability pay when an employer adds hours to or subtracts hours from a scheduled shift with less than 24-hours’ notice.

Additionally, the Formula Retail Employee Rights Notice is now available. Covered employers must post this notice in a conspicuous place at any workplace or job site where any of their covered employees work.

Additional details and examples are available in the text of the final rules. A fact sheet and FAQs are also available on the OLSE’s website.

To review other state laws specific to California, visit the State Lawssection, click on California, and choose your topic of interest from the left-hand navigation menu.

HR360 Editorial Team http://www.hr360.com