The latest changes to your labor law posters

As of today 7/18/2017 here are the most recent changes that have occurred:

  1. Missouri Workers Compensation Notice
  2. Wisconsin Unemployment Insurance
  3. California IWC Wage Orders in English and Spanish
  4. Nevada Pregnant Workers Fairness Act
  5. Oregon Minimum Wage
  6. Utah Workers Compensation Notice
  7. New Hampshire Legislative Protection Notice
  8. Virginia OSHA Notice
  9. USERRA updated logos and colors
  10. E-verify updated
  11. Colorado anti-discrimination Notice
  12. Delaware Industrial Affairs
  13. District of Columbia Minimum Wage

Don’t worry you can always purchase our subscription plans and we send you a free poster for the entire length of coverage! http://www.allinoneposters.com/Combination-State-Federal-Poster-Plans/

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Colorado Repeals Certain State Employment Verification Requirements

Employers Still Must Comply with Federal Employment Verification Requirements

A new law in Colorado, effective August 10, 2016, repeals certain state employment verification requirements.

State Verification Law Repealed

Under current state law (until August 10, 2016), each employer in Colorado must:

  • Make an affirmation within 20 days after hiring a new employee and keep a written or electronic copy of the affirmation for the term of employment of each employee; and
  • Keep a written or electronic copy of the employee’s documents required by 8 U.S.C. § 1324a (commonly known as Form I-9 identity and employment authorization documents) and retain the copies for the term of employment of each employee.

Effective August 10, 2016, these requirements are repealed.

Federal Law Still Applicable
The law does not repeal a provision allowing the state Department of Labor and Employment to request documentation that demonstrates compliance with federal verification requirements.

Federal law requires employers to hire only individuals who may legally work in the United States—either U.S. citizens or foreign citizens who have the necessary authorization. To comply with the law, employers must verify the identity and employment authorization of each employee hired to work in the United States by completing and retaining Form I-9,Employment Eligibility Verification.

Employers must have a completed Form I-9 on file for each person on their payroll (or otherwise receiving remuneration) who is required to complete the form. Employers must also keep completed Forms I-9 for a certain amount of time after their employees stop working for them. Once an employee no longer works for the employer, the employer must determine how much longer to keep the employee’s Form I-9. To calculate how long to keep an employee’s Form I-9, click here.

Click here to read the text of the new state law. Additional information regarding Form I-9 is available by clicking here

ORIGINALLY POSTED BY HR360

Colorado: Law Grants Current and Former Employees Access to their Personnel Files

Law Effective January 1, 2017

Under a new law in Colorado, an employee generally has a right to access his or her personnel files maintained by a current or former employer. Key provisions of the law are presented below.

Right of Access

  • Employers must, at least annually, upon the request of an employee, permit that employee to inspect and obtain a copy of any part of his or her own personnel file(s) at the employer’s office and at a time convenient to both the employer and the employee.
  • A former employee may make one inspection of his or her personnel file after termination of employment.
  • An employer may restrict the employee’s or former employee’s access to his or her files to be only in the presence of a person responsible for managing personnel data on behalf of the employer or another employee designated by the employer.
  • The employer may require the employee or former employee to pay the reasonable cost of duplication of documents.

Scope of the Law

  • “Personnel file” means the personnel records of an employee, in the manner maintained by the employer and using reasonable efforts by the employer to collect, that are used or have been used to determine the employee’s qualifications for employment, promotion,additional compensation, or employment termination or otherdisciplinary action.
    • Note: Certain information is excluded from coverage. Click herefor more information.
  • The law does not require an employer to:
    • Create, maintain, or retain a personnel file on an employee or former employee; or
    • Retain any documents that are or were contained in an employee’s or former employee’s personnel file for any specified period of time.
  • Certain financial institutions are exempt from the law’s requirements.

The law is effective January 1, 2017. Click here for more information.

ORIGINALLY POSTED BY HR360