Form I-9 Audits Up Dramatically Since October

I-9 Fines from 2009 to 2017

Fines as a result of I-9 audits are dramatically up the past year.

From October 1, 2017-May 4, 2018, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) conducted 2,282 Form I-9 audits, up from 1,360 audits from October 1, 2016-September 30, 2017. Given this dramatic increase, employers should take a moment to ensure that their Form I-9 compliance practices meet federal requirements. Businesses that fail to comply with these requirements are subject to penalties of up to $2,236 per violation.

4 Quick Form I-9 Compliance Tips

  1. All U.S. employers generally must fill out and keep a Form I-9 for every person they hire for employment in the United States, as long as the person works for pay or other benefits.
  2. Newly hired employees must complete and sign Section 1 of Form I-9 no later than the first day of employment.
  3. An employee must present to the employer an original document or documents that show his or her identity and employment authorization within 3 business days of the date employment begins.
  4. Employers must retain an employee’s completed Form I-9 for as long as the individual works for the employer. However, Form I-9 does not need to be filed with any federal agency.

Posted by HR360

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Connecticut Adopts Salary History Inquiry Ban

New CT Law Effective January 1, 2019

Effective January 1, 2019, a new law generally prohibits Connecticut employers from inquiring about a prospective employee’s wage and salary history unless it is voluntarily disclosed. Notably, the law does not prohibit an employer from inquiring about other elements of a prospective employee’s compensation structure as long as such employer does not inquire about the value of the elements of such compensation structure.

Click here to read the law.

Posted by HR360

Ban on Salary History Inquiry for Vermont Employers

Effective July 1, 2018, a new law prohibits Vermont employers from inquiring about or seeking an applicant’s salary history information, including information on his or her current or past wages, salary, bonuses, or benefits. The law also bans employers from relying on an applicant’s salary history information as a factor in determining whether to interview the applicant.

Notably, the law does not prohibit:

  • After making an offer of employment that includes compensation, confirming or requesting an applicant’s salary history information if the applicant previously disclosed the information voluntarily; or
  • Inquiring about an applicant’s salary expectations or requirements.

Click here to read the law.