Are you ready to stay in compliance?

Preorder your labor law posters now to comply with the 2019 new regulations. Below is a list of the state updates:

STATE NOTICE Revision
AK Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $9.84 to $9.89 effective January 1, 2019.
AR Minimum Wage
AZ Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $10.50 to $11.00 effective January 1, 2019.
CA Family Care and Medical Leave and Pregnancy Disability Leave The DFEH is considering changes to the CFRA Act to add New Parental Leave Act.
Discrimination and Harassment SB 1343 requires employers with five or more employees to provide antiharassment training to
nonsupervisory employees as well as supervisors. Previously the training requirement applied to
employers with at least 50 employees,
Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $10.50 to $11 for 1-25 employees and $11 to $12 for 26+ employees effective January 1, 2019.
IWC Wage Orders (Separate Poster) The Wage Orders will be updated to reflect the new minimum wage rate.
CO Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $10.20 to $11.10 effective January 1, 2019.
DE Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $8.25 to $8.75 effective January 1, 2019.
FL Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $8.25to $8.46 effective January 1, 2019.
HI Discrimination SB 2351 amends Hawaii’s discrimination statute to prohibit employers from asking applicants about salary history.
IL ISERRA Illinois Service Member Employment & Reemployment Rights Act which “clarifies and strengthens” existing laws to ensure
service members’ employment and rights protection while fulfilling military requirements.
LA Earned Income Credit The income limit information will be updated for 2019.
MA Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $11 to $12 effective January 1, 2019.
ME Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $10 to $11 effective January 1, 2019.
MI Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $9.25 to $10 effective January 1, 2019.
MN Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $8.31 to $9.30 effective January 1, 2019.
MO Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $7.85 to $8.60 effective January 1, 2019.
MT Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $8.30 to $8.50 effective January 1, 2019.
NE Unemployment Changes to the state’s Unemployment Insurance law may bring a mandatory poster change.
NJ Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $8.60 to $8.85 effective January 1, 2019.
NY Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $10.40 to $11.10 effective December 31, 2018.
OH Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $8.30 to $8.55 effective January 1, 2019.
RI Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $10.10 to $10.50 effective January 1, 2019.
SD Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $8.85 to $9.10 effective January 1, 2019.
VT Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $10.50 to $10.78 effective January 1, 2019.
WA Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $11.50 to $12 effective January 1, 2019.

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Cal/OSHA Emergency Regulation Approved: Certain Employers Must Electronically Submit Form 300A on Occupational Injuries and Illnesses

News Release No.: 2018-90                                             Date: November 6, 2018

Oakland—Cal/OSHA’s emergency regulations requiring certain employers in California to electronically submit each year their Form 300A summaries of work-related injuries and illnesses to federal OSHA have been approved by the Office of Administrative Law (OAL).

The following employers must submit online the Form 300A covering calendar year 2017 by December 31, 2018:

  • All employers with 250 or more employees, unless specifically exempted by section 2 of Title 8 of the California Code of Regulations.
  • Employers with 20 to 249 employees in the specific industries listed in Appendix H of the emergency regulations.

Employers described above that are now required to submit their 300A summaries online each year should follow the instructions on federal OSHA’s Injury Tracking Application webpage.

Cal/OSHA will proceed with the formal rulemaking process to make the emergency regulations permanent by submitting the required documentation to OAL. The rulemaking process will include a public comment period and public hearing. The dates for the comment period and public hearing will be posted on Cal/OSHA’s proposed regulation page.

The California Division of Occupational Safety and Health, or Cal/OSHA, is the division within the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) that helps protect California’s workers from health and safety hazards on the job in almost every workplace.

Cal/OSHA’s Consultation Services Branch provides free and voluntary assistance to employers to improve their safety and health programs. Employers should call (800) 963-9424 for assistance from Cal/OSHA Consultation Services.

Employees with work-related questions or complaints may contact DIR’s Call Center in English or Spanish at 844-LABOR-DIR (844-522-6734). Complaints can also be filed confidentially with Cal/OSHA district offices.

 

ORIGINALLY POSTED BY DIR. CA.GOV

PREORDER YOUR 2019 LABOR LAW POSTERS

All In One Poster Company will begin taking pre-orders for 2019 labor law posters starting today, November 1st, 2018.

Orders placed on or after November 1st will automatically be on hold. Actual poster shipment will vary by state and can range between December to January based on when the state releases the update.

Our State & Federal Combination poster consists of both State aNew York 2006 FedOSHAnd Federal required notices with the exception of specific industries/cities notices which you can purchase separately. You may opt to purchase the Stand Alone posters which does not include any replacement poster for future updates or you may purchase our subscription plans.

Our State and Federal Combination Poster Subscription Plan was developed to cater to time-constrained Human Resource professionals interested in hassle-free compliance good for one, two or three years. During the entirety of the subscription plan, companies and individuals will automatically receive a BRAND NEW updated Combination Poster (not a sticker, printout, or email) when a mandatory change occurs in either the State or Federal laws. Only the initial shipping cost is billed to you whether you choos

e to go with a 1, 2 or 3 year program, which makes the 3-year option the most cost effective. The plan will commence on the date of purchase and will expire exactly 1, 2, or 3 years from that date.

Enrollment in our Compliance Program subscription

plans works like insurance. It is a prepaid plan. We cannot guarantee that mandatory changes will occur within the duration of any enrollment period, but the plan does guarantee that you receive a replacement poster when they do occur, regardless of how often they occur. Absolutely no refunds will be given after 30 days of purchase.

The pricing you see is for one (1) poster + compliance program only. The pricing is already inclusive of the initial poster. There is no need to purchase a separate standalone poster. If you require a Spanish version, you will need to purchase this separately.

If you are a Federal Contractor, we also offer posters with your additional posting requirements. Our Federal Contractor Package is a 2 part-poster panel that was created especially for Federal Contractors and Sub-Contractors to fulfill compliance posting requirements for both the State and Federal laws

Contact us to purchase your compliance posters at 714-521-7720 or you may go to our website at www.allinoneposters.com

 

New York State Clean Indoor Air Act Includes Vaporizers and E-Cigatrettes

WHAT WAS ADDED: As of November 22, 2017, legislation has included electronic cigarettes, vaporizers, and similar devices to the Clean Indoor Air Act, which bans their use everywhere that smoking tobacco products are prohibited.

BACKGROUND: Effective July 24, 2003, the amended New York State Clean Indoor Air Act (Public Health Law, Article 13-E) prohibits smoking in virtually all indoor public areas including workplaces, restaurants and bars.

WHERE IS SMOKING PROHIBITED
Public Health Law, Article 13-E, Section 1399-o states that smoking shall not be permitted and no person shall smoke in the following indoor areas:

  • Places of employment;
  • Bars and Restaurants;
  • Enclosed indoor swimming areas;
  • Public transportation including all ticketing, boarding and waiting areas; buses, vans, taxicabs and limousines;
  • All places of employment where services are offered to children;
  • All schools, including school grounds;
  • All public and private colleges, universities and other educational and vocational institutions;
  • General hospitals;
  • Residential health-care facilities, except separately designated smoking rooms for adult patients;
  • Commercial establishments used for the purpose of carrying on or exercising any trade, profession, vocation or charitable activity;
  • All indoor arenas;
  • Zoos; and
  • Bingo facilities.

WHERE IS SMOKING PERMITTED
Smoking is permitted in the following areas or businesses:

  • Private homes and private residences when not used for day care; private automobiles;
  • Hotel or motel rooms rented to one or more guests;
  • Retail tobacco businesses (primary activity is the retail sale of tobacco products and accessories, and the sale of other products is merely incidental);
  • Membership associations where all duties related to the operation of the association are performed by volunteers who are not compensated in any manner;
  • Cigar bars in existence prior to January 1, 2003 (where 10% or more of total annual gross income is from the sale of tobacco products); and
  • Up to 25% of seating in outdoor areas of restaurants with no roof or ceiling enclosure may be designated smoking areas.

POSTING OF SIGNS
Public Health Law, Article 13-E, Section 1399-p Posting of Signs

“Smoking” or “No Smoking” signs, or the international “No Smoking” symbol, which consists of a pictorial representation of a burning cigarette enclosed in a circle with a bar across it, shall be prominently posted and properly maintained where smoking is regulated (prohibited or permitted) by this article, by the owner, operator, manager or other person having control of such area. ALL IN ONE POSTER COMPANY offers a NO SMOKING and NO VAPING COMBINATION SIGN that may be used in accordance with the amendment to the law that now includes electronic cigarettes, vaporizes, and similar devices.

VIOLATION AND PENALTY
The enforcement officer for a city or county health department can assess a penalty of up to $1,000 for each violation. In areas where the State Health Department is the enforcement officer, a fine of up to $2,000 may be assessed.

California Immigrant Worker Protection Act (AB 450) Template Now Available

California – Assembly Bill 450, signed by Jerry Brown on October 5, took effect January 1, 2018 and adds new provisions to the Government Code. To help employers comply with the notification and posting requirement, the bill required the Labor Commissioner to create a template by July 1, 2018 and is now available. Click HERE, then click on California to view and download the Notice of Inspection of I-9 Employment Eligibility Verification Forms.

What Employers Need to Know

1.) Beginning January 1, 2018, both public and private employers (and their agents) are prohibited from providing voluntary consent to an immigration enforcement agent to enter nonpublic areas of a place of labor unless the agent provides a judicial warrant.

2.) The law also prohibits employers (or their agents) from providing voluntary consent to an immigration enforcement agent to access, review, or obtain the employer’s employee records without a subpoena or court order.

Employers Must Post New Notice on July 1, 2018

3.) Employers will have to post to current employees a notice of inspection of Form I-9 (and any other employment records) by an immigration agency within 72 hours of receiving the federal notice of inspection, in the language the employer normally uses to communicate employment information.

4.) Employers, upon reasonable request, must also provide an affected employee (employees identified by the immigration agency as ones who may lack work authorization) with a copy of the notice of inspection of Form I-9s.

Immigration Inspection Deficiency Notice

5.) After an inspection, employers will have to provide the affected employee and the employee’s authorized representative a copy of the written immigration agency notice (the “Notice of Suspect Documents” or NSD) within 72 hours of receipt, including the result of such inspection if an employee is impacted, and obligations of the employee and employer as a result. This notice must be hand-delivered if possible, otherwise by mail and email, and should contain:

  • A description of any deficiencies identified in the notice;
  • The time period for correcting deficiencies;
  • The time and date of any meeting with the employer to correct deficiencies;
  • Notice that the employee has the right to representation during any meeting scheduled with the employer.

Violation Citation and Fines

6.) The California Labor Commissioner or Attorney General has the exclusive authority to enforce these provisions and can impose penalties of $2,000 up to $5,000 for a first violation, and $5,000 up to $10,000 for each subsequent violation under the law.

For a list of Frequently Asked Questions, visit https://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/AB_450_QA.pdf

Maryland Releases Updated Sick and Safe Leave Poster and Model Policies Under Healthy Working Families Act

Maryland has released an updated poster and model policies regarding its sick and safe leave law, which is currently in effect. The newly updated poster will be included in our Maryland All-In-One posters beginning March 16, 2018. For customers who have already purchased 2018 Maryland posters earlier this year, you may download, print, and post this bilingual notice beside your existing poster.

Updated Poster and Model Policies
An employer must notify its employees that they are entitled to earned sick and safe leave under the law. The state has released an updated poster (in English and Spanish) for employer use. Additionally, model policies for employee handbooks or other employee benefits documents are available.

Note: These documents (as well as the FAQs discussed below) are intended to provide general guidance about the law’s requirements and may be subject to change. The state is expected to release final guidance documents in the future.

Updated FAQs and Additional Resources
The state has also released updated FAQs that address various topics (e.g., applicability, accrual, use, verification) regarding the sick and safe leave law.

Additional resources (including guidance and executive orders) are available by clicking here.

Background
Under the law, an employer with 15 or more employees generally must provide an employee with paid earned sick and safe leave, while an employer with 14 or fewer employees must (at least) provide an employee with unpaid earned sick and safe leave. The law does not apply to an employee who (among other things) regularly works less than 12 hours a week.

Originally posted by HR360

What Is My California Wage Order?

The California Industrial Welfare Commission (IWC) Wage Orders regulate wages, hours, and working conditions.  Employers must comply with the IWC Wage Order and California and Federal labor laws applicable to their business or industry.

For example, IWC Wage Order 1 applies to the manufacturing industry; Wage Order 4 applies to professional, technical, clerical, mechanical and similar occupations; Wage Order 7 applies to the mercantile industry; Wage Order 9 applies to the transportation industry; Wage Order 12 applies to the motion picture industry; Wage Order 14 applies to agricultural occupations; Wage Order 15 applies to household occupations; and Wage Order 16 applies to occupations in the construction, drilling, logging and mining industries.

Here are several things you need to know about the IWC Wage Order:

  • It is required for ALL employers in California to post a copy of the correct IWC Wage Order Poster under Labor Code 1183(d);
  • It is enforced by the California Labor Commissioner’s Office/Division of Labor Standards Enforcement (DLSE);
  • It is the number one required poster on the state’s list of required notices, listed even before the contents of our California and Federal Combination Poster;
  • It states at the very top of the California Minimum Wage notice, “Please post next to your IWC Industry or Occupation Order”.

The California Labor Commissioner’s Office, also known as the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement or DLSE, has created a pamphlet called “WHICH IWC ORDER?  Classifications” to assists employers and employees in determining which IWC Wage Order applies to a business or employee (available at http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/WhichIWCOrderClassifications.PDF).

Each California Wage Order covers regulations on topics such as:

  • Administrative, executive and professional exemptions;
  • Overtime wages;
  • Alternative workweeks;
  • Minimum wages;
  • Reporting time pay;
  • Records retention;
  • Cash shortage and breakage;
  • Uniforms and equipment;
  • Meals and lodging;
  • Meal periods;
  • Rest periods; and
  • Required posting of the order.

The Industrial Welfare Commission (IWC) provides 17 different California Wage Orders. However, the DLSE has not made a determination as to who is classified under the 17th Wage Order – Miscellaneous Employees. Every California employer should know the applicable Wage Order for her/his/its business and employees and the regulations regarding wages, hours and working conditions contained therein.

Here is a list of the 16 different IWC Wage Orders, excluding the one for miscellaneous employees.

(1) Manufacturing Industry (9) Transportation Industry
(2) Personal Services
(gyms, hair and nail salons, massage parlor, etc)
(10) Amusement & Recreation Industry (Amusement Parks, Bowling Alleys, Golf Courses, Ski Resorts, etc.)
(3) Canning, Freezing & Preserving Industry (11) Broadcasting Industry
(Broadcasting and Taping, TV and Radio Broadcasting)
(4) Professional, Technical, Clerical, Mechanical, and Similar Occupations
Teachers, Engineers, Real Estate Brokerage, Financial Firms, Legal Firms, Professional Firms, Travel Agencies, Non-Profit, Government Employees, etc.)
(12) Motion Picture Industry
(Film, TV, Video Production, Advertising Films, Casting, Wardrobe and Property Rental for Production, etc.)
(5) Public Housekeeping Industry (Restaurants, Hotels, Hospitals, Nursing Homes, Public Storage, Grounds and Property Maintenance, Schools with Dormitories, etc) (13) Agricultural Products for Market, On The Farm
(packing, processing, slaughtering, nut hulling/shelling/cracking, etc. when done on grower’s own land and product)
(6) Laundry, Linen Supply, Dry Cleaning and Dyeing Industry (14) Agricultural Occupations
(Field Workers, Fish Hatcheries, Wranglers, Cowboys/Cowgirls, etc.)
(7) Mercantile Industry
(purchasing, selling, or distributing goods or commodities at retail or Wholesale, or renting goods or commodities)
(15) Household Occupations
(Day Workers, Employees of private households)
(8) Industries handling products after harvest (not on the farm) (16) On-Site Construction, Mining, Drilling, Landscaping Industry

For the convenience of our valued customers, All In One Poster Company has created an all-in-one version of the California IWC Wage Order Poster, available in a 24″ x 39″ laminated poster format that can be purchased by itself, or as part of our California Packages that include a California & Federal Combination Poster.

Note: California employers must also comply with additional applicable local requirements, which might include city-specific minimum wage requirements that may be higher than the state minimum wage. All in One Posters has created this page that lists some of the major local posting requirements.

This article is intended as a guide in determining the classifications of businesses and occupations under the Industrial Welfare Commission Orders. These guidelines and classifications of employees are general in nature and the existence of specific facts and circumstances of the employment relationship and operations of a particular employer may require a different determination of proper classification that the general one set forth herein. As new types of businesses and occupations are constantly coming
into existence, there undoubtedly are businesses and occupations that have not been included on the state’s classification index. Additionally, as industry practices and business structures evolve, circumstances may dictate the change in classification of a particular occupation from one wage order to another wage order.

Maryland Healthy Working Families Act Information – Earned Sick and Safe Leave

The Maryland Healthy Working Families Act has gone into effect on February 11, 2018.

However, official and final policies and posters have not yet been completed at this time. The Maryland Department of Labor has created a draft sample employee notice that you may download, print and post in the meantime. You may access this bilingual notice by clicking HERE. This draft sample notice WILL NOT be included in our combination posters at this time as this is only a draft sample.

You may read more about this here: http://dllr.state.md.us/paidleave/

heathly-working-families

Why buy from us? There are many labor law poster companies out there.

Here’s what makes All in One Posters different:

  1. Voted the most accurate labor law poster company in the country after careful review of leading HR companies, including HR360.com.
  2. Our owner’s background as a Cal-OSHA consultant for over 25 years, helping businesses and employers reduce penalty assessments from the labor department and OSHA with a 96% success rate, is the primary basis of our expertise. Our owner’s background is also a certified auditor and has over 15 years of compliance experience.
  3. We have one of the lowest published retail prices of all legitimate labor law poster companies.
  4. We offer a client-first customer service, with emphasis on honesty and integrity, earning us an A+rating with the Better Business Bureau, and a 5-star Yelp rating from our local walk-in customers.
  5. We are a small business located in a single facility in Chandler, AZ where EVERY aspect of work is done (research, manufacturing, sales). This leads to very high quality control. By printing on demand rather than keeping stock, we can also ensure that posters will always be the most updated versions at the time of shipping.
  6. With a culture of giving, we provide automatic discounts to non-profit organizations and educational institutions.
  7. We publish our actual, physical address on our website and are open to the public – a sign of our credibility. Customers routinely walk in, and we invite you to visit our facility if ever you’re in the area.