Are you ready to stay in compliance?

Preorder your labor law posters now to comply with the 2019 new regulations. Below is a list of the state updates:

STATE NOTICE Revision
AK Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $9.84 to $9.89 effective January 1, 2019.
AR Minimum Wage
AZ Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $10.50 to $11.00 effective January 1, 2019.
CA Family Care and Medical Leave and Pregnancy Disability Leave The DFEH is considering changes to the CFRA Act to add New Parental Leave Act.
Discrimination and Harassment SB 1343 requires employers with five or more employees to provide antiharassment training to
nonsupervisory employees as well as supervisors. Previously the training requirement applied to
employers with at least 50 employees,
Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $10.50 to $11 for 1-25 employees and $11 to $12 for 26+ employees effective January 1, 2019.
IWC Wage Orders (Separate Poster) The Wage Orders will be updated to reflect the new minimum wage rate.
CO Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $10.20 to $11.10 effective January 1, 2019.
DE Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $8.25 to $8.75 effective January 1, 2019.
FL Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $8.25to $8.46 effective January 1, 2019.
HI Discrimination SB 2351 amends Hawaii’s discrimination statute to prohibit employers from asking applicants about salary history.
IL ISERRA Illinois Service Member Employment & Reemployment Rights Act which “clarifies and strengthens” existing laws to ensure
service members’ employment and rights protection while fulfilling military requirements.
LA Earned Income Credit The income limit information will be updated for 2019.
MA Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $11 to $12 effective January 1, 2019.
ME Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $10 to $11 effective January 1, 2019.
MI Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $9.25 to $10 effective January 1, 2019.
MN Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $8.31 to $9.30 effective January 1, 2019.
MO Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $7.85 to $8.60 effective January 1, 2019.
MT Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $8.30 to $8.50 effective January 1, 2019.
NE Unemployment Changes to the state’s Unemployment Insurance law may bring a mandatory poster change.
NJ Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $8.60 to $8.85 effective January 1, 2019.
NY Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $10.40 to $11.10 effective December 31, 2018.
OH Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $8.30 to $8.55 effective January 1, 2019.
RI Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $10.10 to $10.50 effective January 1, 2019.
SD Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $8.85 to $9.10 effective January 1, 2019.
VT Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $10.50 to $10.78 effective January 1, 2019.
WA Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $11.50 to $12 effective January 1, 2019.

Wordpress Blog 2019

Cal/OSHA Emergency Regulation Approved: Certain Employers Must Electronically Submit Form 300A on Occupational Injuries and Illnesses

News Release No.: 2018-90                                             Date: November 6, 2018

Oakland—Cal/OSHA’s emergency regulations requiring certain employers in California to electronically submit each year their Form 300A summaries of work-related injuries and illnesses to federal OSHA have been approved by the Office of Administrative Law (OAL).

The following employers must submit online the Form 300A covering calendar year 2017 by December 31, 2018:

  • All employers with 250 or more employees, unless specifically exempted by section 2 of Title 8 of the California Code of Regulations.
  • Employers with 20 to 249 employees in the specific industries listed in Appendix H of the emergency regulations.

Employers described above that are now required to submit their 300A summaries online each year should follow the instructions on federal OSHA’s Injury Tracking Application webpage.

Cal/OSHA will proceed with the formal rulemaking process to make the emergency regulations permanent by submitting the required documentation to OAL. The rulemaking process will include a public comment period and public hearing. The dates for the comment period and public hearing will be posted on Cal/OSHA’s proposed regulation page.

The California Division of Occupational Safety and Health, or Cal/OSHA, is the division within the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) that helps protect California’s workers from health and safety hazards on the job in almost every workplace.

Cal/OSHA’s Consultation Services Branch provides free and voluntary assistance to employers to improve their safety and health programs. Employers should call (800) 963-9424 for assistance from Cal/OSHA Consultation Services.

Employees with work-related questions or complaints may contact DIR’s Call Center in English or Spanish at 844-LABOR-DIR (844-522-6734). Complaints can also be filed confidentially with Cal/OSHA district offices.

 

ORIGINALLY POSTED BY DIR. CA.GOV

PREORDER YOUR 2019 LABOR LAW POSTERS

All In One Poster Company will begin taking pre-orders for 2019 labor law posters starting today, November 1st, 2018.

Orders placed on or after November 1st will automatically be on hold. Actual poster shipment will vary by state and can range between December to January based on when the state releases the update.

Our State & Federal Combination poster consists of both State aNew York 2006 FedOSHAnd Federal required notices with the exception of specific industries/cities notices which you can purchase separately. You may opt to purchase the Stand Alone posters which does not include any replacement poster for future updates or you may purchase our subscription plans.

Our State and Federal Combination Poster Subscription Plan was developed to cater to time-constrained Human Resource professionals interested in hassle-free compliance good for one, two or three years. During the entirety of the subscription plan, companies and individuals will automatically receive a BRAND NEW updated Combination Poster (not a sticker, printout, or email) when a mandatory change occurs in either the State or Federal laws. Only the initial shipping cost is billed to you whether you choos

e to go with a 1, 2 or 3 year program, which makes the 3-year option the most cost effective. The plan will commence on the date of purchase and will expire exactly 1, 2, or 3 years from that date.

Enrollment in our Compliance Program subscription

plans works like insurance. It is a prepaid plan. We cannot guarantee that mandatory changes will occur within the duration of any enrollment period, but the plan does guarantee that you receive a replacement poster when they do occur, regardless of how often they occur. Absolutely no refunds will be given after 30 days of purchase.

The pricing you see is for one (1) poster + compliance program only. The pricing is already inclusive of the initial poster. There is no need to purchase a separate standalone poster. If you require a Spanish version, you will need to purchase this separately.

If you are a Federal Contractor, we also offer posters with your additional posting requirements. Our Federal Contractor Package is a 2 part-poster panel that was created especially for Federal Contractors and Sub-Contractors to fulfill compliance posting requirements for both the State and Federal laws

Contact us to purchase your compliance posters at 714-521-7720 or you may go to our website at www.allinoneposters.com

 

Oregon Law That Imposes Scheduling and Working Hours Obligations on Employers Takes Effect July 1, 2018

Senate Bill 828, enacted by the 2017 Legislative Assembly, establishes work scheduling standards for certain employers in retail, hospitality, or food services industries that have at least 500 employees worldwide. The majority of the bill becomes effective July 1, 2018.
 
Q. What is a covered employer?
 
A.  Covered employers include employers and successor employers in retail, hospitality, or food services establishments that employ 500 or more employees worldwide, including chains and integrated enterprises.
 
To determine the number of employees employed by an employer, the calculation is based on the average number of employees employed on each work day during each of 20 or more workweeks in the current calendar year or immediately preceding calendar year.
 
Q. Who is a covered employee?
 
A. An employee who is employed in a retail establishment, a hospitality establishment, or a food service establishment that provides services related to retail trade, hotels and motels, or food services.
 
Q. Are any employees not covered?
 
A. Yes. Salaried employees who are exempt from minimum wage, workers supplied by a worker leasing company,and employees of a business that provides services to or on behalf of an employer, are not covered by this law.
 
Q. What does the law require?
 
A. Good faith estimate of work schedule.  Employers must provide a new employee a written good faith estimate of the work schedule at the time of hire that:
·       States the median number of hours the employee is expected to work in an average month;
·       Explains the voluntary standby list;
·       Explains whether the employee who is not on a standby list may expect to work on-call shifts, and if so, sets forth an objective standard for when an employee may be expected to work on-call shifts if the employee is not on the standby list; and
·       May be based on prior year schedule if it is a good-faith estimate of seasonal or episodic work.
 
Voluntary standby list. Employers may maintain a voluntary standby list of employees willing to work additional hours due to unanticipated customer needs or unexpected absences if listed employees have requested or agreed in writing and the employer notifies each employee, in writing:
·       That the list is voluntary and lays out how to be removed from the list;
·       How the employer will notify standby list employees of additional hours and how to accept the additional hours;
·       That the employee is not required to accept the additional hours offered; and
·       That an employee on the standby list is not eligible for additional compensation for changes to the employee’s written work schedule resulting from acceptance of additional hours as a result of being on the list.
 
Advance notice of work schedule. The employer must provide an employee with a work schedule, in writing, at least seven calendar days before the first day on the schedule (14 days on and after July 1, 2020). The work schedule must be posted in a conspicuous and accessible location.
 
The employer must provide a written work schedule that runs through the last date of the posted schedule to:
·       A new employee on or before first day of work; or
·       An existing employee on the first day of work after a leave of absence.
 
The written work schedule must include all work shifts and on-call shifts for the work period.
If the employer requests changes to the written work schedule after the advance notice is given:
 
·       Employer must provide the employee with timely notice of the change; and
·       The employee may decline any work shifts not included in the employee’s written work schedule.
 
At any time after the advance notice has been given, an employee may request in writing that the employer add the employee to work shifts or on-call shifts without penalty to employer.
 
Right to rest between shifts. Unless the employee requests or consents to work such hours, the employer may not schedule or require an employee to work during:
·       The first 10 hours following the end of a previous calendar day’s work or on-call shift; or
·       The first 10 hours following the end of a work or on-call shift that spanned two calendar days.
 
If an employee works during the first 10-hour periods as listed above, the employer must compensate the employee for each hour or portion of an hour that the employee works at the rate of one and one-half times the employee’s regular rate of pay. This premium pay provision does not apply to any hour or portion of an hour worked during which the employee is providing offsite repair assistance to a motorist with a disabled vehicle (roadside assistance).
 
Right to input into work schedule. At time of hire and during employment, an employee may identify any limitations or changes in work schedule availability and may also request not to be scheduled for work shifts during certain times or at certain work locations. While an employer may not retaliate against an employee for making such a request, the employer is under no obligation to grant the employee’s request.
 
Compensation for work schedule changes. An employer is required to provide compensation to an employee for each employer-requested change that occurs to a written work schedule without advance notice (seven days effective July 1, 2018; 14 days starting July 1, 2020), as follows:                                         
·         One hour at the regular rate of pay, in addition to wages earned when the employer:
o   Adds more than 30 minutes of work to the employee’s shift;
 
o   Changes the date or start time or end time of the employee’s work shift with no loss of hours; or
 
o   Schedules the employee for an additional work or on-call shift.
 
·         One-half times the employee’s regular rate of pay, per hour, for each scheduled hour that the employee does not work when the employer:
 
o   Subtracts hours from the employee’s work shift before or after the employee reports for duty;
 
o   Changes the date or start time or end time of the employee’s shift, resulting in a loss of work shift hours;
 
o   Cancels the employee’s work shift; or
 
o   Does not ask the employee to perform work when the employee is scheduled for an on-call shift.
 
  Q. What are the notice and posting requirements?
A. Employers must display a poster, which is developed by the Bureau of Labor and Industries, giving notice of the rights and responsibilities of this law. The poster must be posted in a conspicuous place at the workplace or provided on an individual basis if displaying the poster is not feasible. To access the poster, you may click on our LIST OF ADDITIONAL POSTING REQUIREMENTS then click on your state. All In One Poster Company has provided this list of downloadable notices that may be posted alongside our Oregon and Federal Combination Poster
 
Also, the employer is required to post the written work schedule in a conspicuous and accessible place, in English and in the language the employer typically uses to communicate with the employees.
 
Employers are required to provide employees on a standby list notice of additional hours by:
 
·       In-person conversation;
   
·       Telephone call;
  
·       Email;
  
·       Text message; or
  
·       Other electronic or written format.
   
Q. What if an employee wants to work extra shifts?
 
A. At any time after the advance notice of written work schedule is made, an employee may request in writing that the employer add the employee to more shifts. Changes to the written work schedule resulting from these written requests are not subject to the advance notice requirements of this law.
 
Q. What if an employee asks not to be scheduled?
 
A. An employee may decline any work shifts not included in the employee’s written work schedule and may request, in writing, to be added to one or more work shifts or on-call work shifts. In addition, an employee may request not to be scheduled for work shifts during certain times or at certain locations, but an employer may require the employee to provide reasonable verification of the need for such a request. An employer may not retaliate against an employee for making a request to not be scheduled, but is under no obligation to grant the employee’s request to be taken off shifts.

Proposed OSHA Rule for California Indoor Heat Illness Protection due January 1, 2019

On September 29, 2016, Governor Brown signed a bill that directs Cal/OSHA to create a regulation protecting employees of indoor workplaces from heat illness. Section 6720 was added to SB 1167 requiring that a proposed rule be submitted to Cal/OSHA Standards Board by January 1, 2019. The standard would apply to all indoor work areas where the temperature equals or exceeds 80 degrees Fahrenheit when employees are present.

In November 2015, the California Occupational Safety and Health Appeals Board has ruled in favor of Cal/OSHA’s citations against two employers because their Injury and Illness Prevention Programs (IIPP) failed to effectively address the hazard of indoor heat.

“This is the first case of indoor heat considered by the Appeals Board. In this case, the ruling affirms that California’s IIPP standard can be used to address hazards that the standard does not specifically identify, including indoor heat,” said Christine Baker, Director of the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR).

On-the-job heat exposure is a risk during operations involving high air temperatures, radiant heat sources, high humidity, direct physical contact with hot objects, or strenuous physical activities. Affected workplaces may include foundries, brick-firing and ceramic plants, glass products facilities, rubber products plants, electric utilities, commercial kitchens, laundries, chemical plants, and smelters.

OSHA emphasizes that while thousands of workers become sick each year from occupational heat exposure, the illnesses and deaths that can result are preventable.

All in One Poster Company designed the California Heat Illness Prevention for Indoor Work Environments to address this requirement. Our poster contains steps to prevent heat illness, types of heat illnesses and treatments, and steps that both employees and employers can take to address this issue and create a plan of action. Our easy-to-read, laminated poster is designed to supplement the mandatory training that will be required by the Cal/OSHA standard. It can also be used as a quick reference guide in preventing heat stress, heat exhaustion, heat stroke, or even death.

Our California Heat Illness Prevention for Indoor Work Environments Poster is available in both English and Spanish, and measures 24″ x 39″.

All in One Posters - California Heat Illness Prevention for Indoor Working Environments