Cal/OSHA Produces Fact Sheet, Poster for Preventing Work-Related Injuries to Housekeeping Workers

Oakland—Cal/OSHA has produced a fact sheet and poster to help employers in the hotel and lodging industry comply with a new regulation to prevent work-related injuries suffered by housekeeping workers. The Hotel Housekeeping Musculoskeletal Injury Prevention regulation went into effect July 1 and requires employers to complete an initial worksite evaluation by October 1 to identify and address housekeeping worker hazards.

The Safety and Health Fact Sheet provides an overview of the workplace health and Preventing Musculoskeletal Injuries in Housekeepers postersafety requirements that reduce the risk of musculoskeletal injuries and disorders common among housekeepers. Employers are also encouraged to post the Preventing Musculoskeletal Injuries in Housekeepers poster in a place accessible to all housekeeping workers. The poster includes information on the causes of musculoskeletal injuries, the employer’s responsibility to have an effective program to control the risk of musculoskeletal injuries, and employees’ rights.

“We created these guidance materials to help workers know their rights and employers their responsibilities to comply with this standard,” said Cal/OSHA Chief Juliann Sum. “In addition, Cal/OSHA Consultation Services are available to assist employers and employees who have questions or need more information.”

The employer’s housekeeping safety program must include the following:

  • Procedures to identify and evaluate housekeeping hazards through worksite evaluations
  • Procedures to investigate musculoskeletal injuries to housekeepers
  • Methods to correct identified hazards
  • Employee and supervisor training on safe work practices and on the process for early reporting of injuries to the employer
  • Procedures to involve employees and their union representative in worksite evaluations, injury investigations, and evaluation of corrective measures

A musculoskeletal injury is caused by a single traumatic event, such as slip, trip or fall, or by repeated exposure over weeks, months or years to repetitive motion, force, vibration or awkward positions caused by daily tasks such as lifting heavy furniture and equipment, pulling linens and pushing carts.

In 2012, hotel worker representatives presented a petition to the Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board requesting a new standard to control the hazards faced by hotel housekeepers. Cal/OSHA convened public advisory meetings over a three-year period to gather information, and determined that existing regulations did not adequately address the hazards faced by housekeepers. Dozens of workers spoke at the meetings, sharing their experiences and discussing how their injuries impacted their lives at work and at home.

The California Division of Occupational Safety and Health, or Cal/OSHA, is the division within the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) that helps protect California’s workers from health and safety hazards on the job in almost every workplace.

Hotel and lodging industry employers are encouraged to contact Cal/OSHA’s Consultation Services Branch for free on-site or telephone consultations. Consultation Services assist employers in developing and maintaining workplace safety and health programs pursuant to Cal/OSHA’s regulations. Employers and employees can call (800) 963-9424 for assistance from Cal/OSHA Consultation Services.

Employees with work-related questions or complaints may contact DIR’s Call Center in English or Spanish at 844-LABOR-DIR (844-522-6734). Complaints can also be filed confidentially with Cal/OSHA district offices.

 

 

ORIGINALLY POSTED BY DIR

Cal/OSHA Reminds Employers to Protect Outdoor Workers from Heat Illness as Temperatures Rise Statewide

AIO Heat Stress 2018 (WordPress blog)

Our California Outdoor Heat Illness Prevention Poster is on sale for the entire Summer of 2018 saving you 15% of our already low prices. Take advantage of this offer now by using coupon code HEAT2018 upon checkout.

Cal/OSHA is reminding all employers to protect their outdoor workers from heat illness and to encourage their workers to take preventative cool-down breaks in the shade as temperatures rise throughout California. The National Weather Service has issued excessive heat warnings for forecasts of triple-digit temperatures through the weekend, starting Thursday, June 21st, in Southern California and beginning Friday in central and northern counties. Summer has officially begun.

“During heat waves, employers must closely observe their employees for signs and symptoms of heat illness,” said Cal/OSHA Chief Juliann Sum. “As always, workers should be encouraged to drink water frequently and take preventative cool-down rest breaks in the shade when they feel the need to do so.”

To help employers comply with the state’s Heat Illness Prevention Regulation, All In One Poster Company has designed a comprehensive poster to supplement the Cal/OSHA standard training requirement and the employer’s Injury and Illness Prevention Program (IIPP), and to serve as a quick reference guide. Remember that displaying posters is a sign of your commitment to safety.

CAHeatStress2015

This poster contains the following information:

  • Steps to Preventing Heat Stress according to Cal/OSHA
  • Symptoms of Heat Exhaustion
  • Symptoms of Heat Stroke
  • What to do for Heat-Related Illness

California’s heat illness prevention regulation requires employers with outdoor workers to take the following four steps to prevent heat illness:

  • Plan – Develop and implement an effective written heat illness prevention plan that includes emergency response procedures.
  • Training – Train all employees and supervisors on heat illness prevention.
  • Water – Provide drinking water that is fresh, pure, suitably cool and free of charge so that each worker can drink at least 1 quart per hour, and encourage workers to do so.
  • Shade – Provide shade when workers request it and when temperatures exceed 80 degrees. Encourage workers to take a cool-down rest in the shade for at least five minutes. They should not wait until they feel sick to cool down.

Cal/OSHA urges workers experiencing possible overheating to take a preventative cool-down rest in the shade until symptoms are gone. Workers who have existing health problems or medical conditions that reduce tolerance to heat, such as diabetes, need to be extra vigilant. Some high blood pressure and anti-inflammatory medications can also increase a worker’s risk for heat illness.

In addition to the other requirements outlined in California’s heat illness prevention regulation, it is crucial that supervisors are effectively trained on emergency procedures in case a worker does get sick. This helps ensure sick employees receive treatment immediately and that the symptoms do not develop into a serious illness or death.

Cal/OSHA’s Heat Illness Prevention special emphasis program, the first of its kind in the nation, includes enforcement of heat regulations as well as multilingual outreach and training programs for California’s employers and workers. Online information on heat illness prevention requirements and training materials are available on Cal/OSHA’s Heat Illness Prevention web page and the Water. Rest. Shade. campaign site. A Heat Illness Prevention e-tool is also available on Cal/OSHA’s website.

For indoor workers in California, All In One Posters has also put together a California Indoor Heat Stress Poster seen below. This poster was created in response to a bill that was signed by Governor Brown in which section 6720 was added to SB 1167 to add protection for indoor workers against indoor heat.

All in One Posters - California Heat Illness Prevention for Indoor Working Environments

On-the-job heat exposure is a risk during operations involving high air temperatures, radiant heat sources, high humidity, direct physical contact with hot objects, or strenuous physical activities. Affected workplaces may include foundries, brick-firing and ceramic plants, glass products facilities, rubber products plants, electric utilities, commercial kitchens, laundries, chemical plants, and smelters.

OSHA emphasizes that while thousands of workers become sick each year from occupational heat exposure, the illnesses and deaths that can result are preventable.

All in One Poster Company designed the California Heat Illness Prevention for Indoor Work Environments to address this problem. Our poster contains steps to prevent heat illness, types of heat illnesses and treatments, and steps that both employees and employers can take to address this issue and create a plan of action.

Pasadena California Gets Minimum Wage Increase This July 1, 2018

Beginning July 1, 2018, employers with 26 or more employees must pay wages of not less than $13.25 per hour (in addition to any tips received) to each employee. For employers with 25 or less employees, the minimum wage is $12.00 per hour.

The official posters must be posted in a conspicuous place, accessible to all employees, where the other state and federal labor law posters are also posted. They can be downloaded below:

Pasadena 25 or less

25 or less employees

Pasadena 26 or more

26 or more employees

The minimum wage requirement set forth in the Pasadena Minimum Wage Ordinance applies to adult and minor employees who work two (2) or more hours per week in Pasadena.

Under the Ordinance, employees who assert their rights to receive the City’s minimum wage are protected from retaliation. Employees may file a civil lawsuit against their employers for any violation of the Ordinance or may file a complaint with the City’s Department of Planning and Community Development. The City will investigate possible violations and, where appropriate, will obtain payroll records as provided by law, and will enforce violations of the minimum wage requirements by ordering reinstatement of employees, payment of back wages unlawfully withheld, and penalties. In addition, any business that violates the provisions of the Pasadena Minimum Wage Ordinance is subject to criminal prosecution.

 

City of Emeryville CA Minimum Wage Increase Takes Effect July 1, 2018

New Rates for Small and Large Employers

Effective July 1, 2018, the minimum wage in Emeryville, California will rise to $15.00 per hour for small businesses (55 or fewer employees) and to $15.69 per hour for large businesses (56 or more employees). Paid sick leave requirements will remain the same.

Click here for more information.

California Immigrant Worker Protection Act (AB 450) Template Now Available

California – Assembly Bill 450, signed by Jerry Brown on October 5, took effect January 1, 2018 and adds new provisions to the Government Code. To help employers comply with the notification and posting requirement, the bill required the Labor Commissioner to create a template by July 1, 2018 and is now available. Click HERE, then click on California to view and download the Notice of Inspection of I-9 Employment Eligibility Verification Forms.

What Employers Need to Know

1.) Beginning January 1, 2018, both public and private employers (and their agents) are prohibited from providing voluntary consent to an immigration enforcement agent to enter nonpublic areas of a place of labor unless the agent provides a judicial warrant.

2.) The law also prohibits employers (or their agents) from providing voluntary consent to an immigration enforcement agent to access, review, or obtain the employer’s employee records without a subpoena or court order.

Employers Must Post New Notice on July 1, 2018

3.) Employers will have to post to current employees a notice of inspection of Form I-9 (and any other employment records) by an immigration agency within 72 hours of receiving the federal notice of inspection, in the language the employer normally uses to communicate employment information.

4.) Employers, upon reasonable request, must also provide an affected employee (employees identified by the immigration agency as ones who may lack work authorization) with a copy of the notice of inspection of Form I-9s.

Immigration Inspection Deficiency Notice

5.) After an inspection, employers will have to provide the affected employee and the employee’s authorized representative a copy of the written immigration agency notice (the “Notice of Suspect Documents” or NSD) within 72 hours of receipt, including the result of such inspection if an employee is impacted, and obligations of the employee and employer as a result. This notice must be hand-delivered if possible, otherwise by mail and email, and should contain:

  • A description of any deficiencies identified in the notice;
  • The time period for correcting deficiencies;
  • The time and date of any meeting with the employer to correct deficiencies;
  • Notice that the employee has the right to representation during any meeting scheduled with the employer.

Violation Citation and Fines

6.) The California Labor Commissioner or Attorney General has the exclusive authority to enforce these provisions and can impose penalties of $2,000 up to $5,000 for a first violation, and $5,000 up to $10,000 for each subsequent violation under the law.

For a list of Frequently Asked Questions, visit https://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/AB_450_QA.pdf

What Is My California Wage Order?

The California Industrial Welfare Commission (IWC) Wage Orders regulate wages, hours, and working conditions.  Employers must comply with the IWC Wage Order and California and Federal labor laws applicable to their business or industry.

For example, IWC Wage Order 1 applies to the manufacturing industry; Wage Order 4 applies to professional, technical, clerical, mechanical and similar occupations; Wage Order 7 applies to the mercantile industry; Wage Order 9 applies to the transportation industry; Wage Order 12 applies to the motion picture industry; Wage Order 14 applies to agricultural occupations; Wage Order 15 applies to household occupations; and Wage Order 16 applies to occupations in the construction, drilling, logging and mining industries.

Here are several things you need to know about the IWC Wage Order:

  • It is required for ALL employers in California to post a copy of the correct IWC Wage Order Poster under Labor Code 1183(d);
  • It is enforced by the California Labor Commissioner’s Office/Division of Labor Standards Enforcement (DLSE);
  • It is the number one required poster on the state’s list of required notices, listed even before the contents of our California and Federal Combination Poster;
  • It states at the very top of the California Minimum Wage notice, “Please post next to your IWC Industry or Occupation Order”.

The California Labor Commissioner’s Office, also known as the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement or DLSE, has created a pamphlet called “WHICH IWC ORDER?  Classifications” to assists employers and employees in determining which IWC Wage Order applies to a business or employee (available at http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/WhichIWCOrderClassifications.PDF).

Each California Wage Order covers regulations on topics such as:

  • Administrative, executive and professional exemptions;
  • Overtime wages;
  • Alternative workweeks;
  • Minimum wages;
  • Reporting time pay;
  • Records retention;
  • Cash shortage and breakage;
  • Uniforms and equipment;
  • Meals and lodging;
  • Meal periods;
  • Rest periods; and
  • Required posting of the order.

The Industrial Welfare Commission (IWC) provides 17 different California Wage Orders. However, the DLSE has not made a determination as to who is classified under the 17th Wage Order – Miscellaneous Employees. Every California employer should know the applicable Wage Order for her/his/its business and employees and the regulations regarding wages, hours and working conditions contained therein.

Here is a list of the 16 different IWC Wage Orders, excluding the one for miscellaneous employees.

(1) Manufacturing Industry (9) Transportation Industry
(2) Personal Services
(gyms, hair and nail salons, massage parlor, etc)
(10) Amusement & Recreation Industry (Amusement Parks, Bowling Alleys, Golf Courses, Ski Resorts, etc.)
(3) Canning, Freezing & Preserving Industry (11) Broadcasting Industry
(Broadcasting and Taping, TV and Radio Broadcasting)
(4) Professional, Technical, Clerical, Mechanical, and Similar Occupations
Teachers, Engineers, Real Estate Brokerage, Financial Firms, Legal Firms, Professional Firms, Travel Agencies, Non-Profit, Government Employees, etc.)
(12) Motion Picture Industry
(Film, TV, Video Production, Advertising Films, Casting, Wardrobe and Property Rental for Production, etc.)
(5) Public Housekeeping Industry (Restaurants, Hotels, Hospitals, Nursing Homes, Public Storage, Grounds and Property Maintenance, Schools with Dormitories, etc) (13) Agricultural Products for Market, On The Farm
(packing, processing, slaughtering, nut hulling/shelling/cracking, etc. when done on grower’s own land and product)
(6) Laundry, Linen Supply, Dry Cleaning and Dyeing Industry (14) Agricultural Occupations
(Field Workers, Fish Hatcheries, Wranglers, Cowboys/Cowgirls, etc.)
(7) Mercantile Industry
(purchasing, selling, or distributing goods or commodities at retail or Wholesale, or renting goods or commodities)
(15) Household Occupations
(Day Workers, Employees of private households)
(8) Industries handling products after harvest (not on the farm) (16) On-Site Construction, Mining, Drilling, Landscaping Industry

For the convenience of our valued customers, All In One Poster Company has created an all-in-one version of the California IWC Wage Order Poster, available in a 24″ x 39″ laminated poster format that can be purchased by itself, or as part of our California Packages that include a California & Federal Combination Poster.

Note: California employers must also comply with additional applicable local requirements, which might include city-specific minimum wage requirements that may be higher than the state minimum wage. All in One Posters has created this page that lists some of the major local posting requirements.

This article is intended as a guide in determining the classifications of businesses and occupations under the Industrial Welfare Commission Orders. These guidelines and classifications of employees are general in nature and the existence of specific facts and circumstances of the employment relationship and operations of a particular employer may require a different determination of proper classification that the general one set forth herein. As new types of businesses and occupations are constantly coming
into existence, there undoubtedly are businesses and occupations that have not been included on the state’s classification index. Additionally, as industry practices and business structures evolve, circumstances may dictate the change in classification of a particular occupation from one wage order to another wage order.

California Transgender Rights Included In Our 2018 All In One Labor Law Posters

California Law Effective January 1, 2018

A new law in California adds posting and sexual harassment training requirements for certain employers. A summary of the law is listed below.

New Posting Requirement
Under the new law, every employer must post a notice (developed by the state) regarding transgender rights in a prominent and accessible location in the workplace.

General topics covered by this poster include:

  • Definitions of certain terms such as transgender, gender identity, gender expression and gender transition.
  • The importance of allowing an employee to dress in accordance with the employee’s gender identity and expression.
  • A discussion on the right of employees to use restrooms, locker rooms and other similar facilities corresponding to their gender identity.

“We expect this posting requirement to increase understanding of the law and assist California employers in providing safe and inclusive work environments,”
– Kevin Kish, Director of DFEH.

New Sexual Harassment Training Requirements
Under current law, employers with 50 or more employees must provide at least 2 hours of classroom or other effective interactive training and education regarding sexual harassment to all supervisory employees in California within 6 months of their assumption of a supervisory position. A covered employer must provide sexual harassment training and education to each supervisory employee in California once every 2 yearsClick here (§ 12950.1) for more details.

Under the new law, covered employers must also provide training inclusive of harassment based on gender identity, gender expression, and sexual orientation as a component of the training and education specified above. The training and education must include practical examples inclusive of harassment based on gender identity, gender expression, and sexual orientation, and must be presented by trainers or educators with knowledge and expertise in those areas.

Additional provisions are contained in the text of the new law. The law is effective January 1, 2018.

These notices can be obtained free of charge from the California Department of Industrial Relations.

  • For the convenience of our customers, we will be including the new Transgender Rights In The Workplace notice in our 2018 California & Federal Combination Posters.
  • Also, to aid in sexual harassment training, we are also offering the newly updated California Sexual Harassment Notice as a laminated poster available in 3 different sizes. Displaying a poster signifies compliance and is evidence for the training provided.
  • The newly updated California Industrial Welfare Commission (IWC) Wage Order Posters are also available as a 24″ x 39″ laminated poster. This poster that contains updates for January 2017 and January 2018 is what regulates the working conditions as well the hours and wages of a particular industry or occupation group. It is required by California Labor Code 1183 (d) and enforced by the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement (DLSE).

Rhode Island: Mandated Short Term Disability Rates Increase

Weekly Maximum and Minimum Benefit Rates Increase

Rhode Island has announced that its weekly maximum and minimum short term disability rates have increased.

Background
Rhode Island’s temporary disability insurance program provides income support to individuals who are out of work because of a non-work related illness or injury. To be eligible, an individual must meet certain earnings requirements and be medically certified by a qualified health care provider as unable to work.

An individual’s weekly benefit rate will be equal to 4.62% of the wages paid in the highest quarter of his or her base period.

Updated Rates
For claims with a “Benefit Year Begin Date” of July 3, 2016 or later,$89.00 is the minimum benefit rate and $817.00 is the maximum benefit rate. This does not include dependency allowance. The weekly benefit rate remains the same throughout the entire benefit year.

Click here for more information on Rhode Island’s temporary disability program.

Originally Published by HR 360, Inc.

DOL Issues Guidance for Private Employers on Final Overtime Rule

Guidance Provides Options for Compliance

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has released guidance on its final overtime rule to help private sector employers evaluate current practices and transition to the rule’s requirements.

Background
The DOL’s final rule, effective December 1, 2016, updates the regulations governing which executive, administrative, and professional employees (“white collar” workers) are entitled to the minimum wage and overtime pay protections of the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). The rule focuses primarily on updating the salary and compensation levelsneeded for such workers to be exempt. In particular, the final rule:

  • Raises the salary threshold from $455 a week to $913 per week (or$47,476 annually) for a full-year worker;
  • Sets the highly-compensated employee (HCE) total annual compensation level equal to $134,004 annually;
  • Establishes a mechanism for automatically updating the salary and compensation levels every 3 years, beginning on January 1, 2020; and
  • Amends the regulations to allow employers to use nondiscretionary bonuses, incentives, and commissions to satisfy up to 10% of the new standard salary level, so long asemployers pay those amounts on a quarterly or more frequent basis.

Note: When both the FLSA and a state law apply, the employee is entitled to the most favorable provisions of each law.

New Guidance
Among other things, the DOL’s guidance details some of the options employers may exercise in determining how to comply with the final rule. Employers have certain options for responding to the changes to the salary level, and the DOL does not dictate or recommend any method. Such options include:

  • Providing pay raises that increase workers’ salaries to the new threshold;
  • Spreading employment by reducing or eliminating work hours of individual employees working over 40 hours per week for which no overtime is being paid; or
  • Paying overtime.

Note: The rule does not require employers to convert a salaried worker making less than the new salary threshold to hourly status; employers can pay non-exempt employees on a salary basis and pay overtime for hours worked beyond 40 in a week.

Click here to read the guidance. Additional information on the final rule, including fact sheets and Q&As, is available on the DOL’s final rule webpage.

Originally Published by HR 360, Inc.

San Francisco: Minimum Wage Rises to $13.00 Per Hour on July 1, 2016

As a reminder, the San Francisco minimum wage will rise to $13.00 per hour san-francisco-ordinances-non-laminated-minimum-wage-paid-sick-hcso-fair-chance-family-friendly-imagebeginning July 1, 2016. A new poster reflecting the updated rate (in multiple languages) is now available by clicking here.

Future Minimum Wage Increases in San Francisco
Additional raises are expected according to the following schedule:

  • $14.00 per hour beginning on July 1, 2017;
  • $15.00 per hour beginning on July 1, 2018; and
  • Increased annually by an amount corresponding to the prior year’s increase (if any) in the Consumer Price Index beginning on July 1, 2019.

Click here for more information.

ORIGINALLY POSTED BY HR360