Cal/OSHA Reminds Employers to Protect Outdoor Workers from Heat Illness as Temperatures Rise Statewide

AIO Heat Stress 2018 (WordPress blog)

Our California Outdoor Heat Illness Prevention Poster is on sale for the entire Summer of 2018 saving you 15% of our already low prices. Take advantage of this offer now by using coupon code HEAT2018 upon checkout.

Cal/OSHA is reminding all employers to protect their outdoor workers from heat illness and to encourage their workers to take preventative cool-down breaks in the shade as temperatures rise throughout California. The National Weather Service has issued excessive heat warnings for forecasts of triple-digit temperatures through the weekend, starting Thursday, June 21st, in Southern California and beginning Friday in central and northern counties. Summer has officially begun.

“During heat waves, employers must closely observe their employees for signs and symptoms of heat illness,” said Cal/OSHA Chief Juliann Sum. “As always, workers should be encouraged to drink water frequently and take preventative cool-down rest breaks in the shade when they feel the need to do so.”

To help employers comply with the state’s Heat Illness Prevention Regulation, All In One Poster Company has designed a comprehensive poster to supplement the Cal/OSHA standard training requirement and the employer’s Injury and Illness Prevention Program (IIPP), and to serve as a quick reference guide. Remember that displaying posters is a sign of your commitment to safety.

CAHeatStress2015

This poster contains the following information:

  • Steps to Preventing Heat Stress according to Cal/OSHA
  • Symptoms of Heat Exhaustion
  • Symptoms of Heat Stroke
  • What to do for Heat-Related Illness

California’s heat illness prevention regulation requires employers with outdoor workers to take the following four steps to prevent heat illness:

  • Plan – Develop and implement an effective written heat illness prevention plan that includes emergency response procedures.
  • Training – Train all employees and supervisors on heat illness prevention.
  • Water – Provide drinking water that is fresh, pure, suitably cool and free of charge so that each worker can drink at least 1 quart per hour, and encourage workers to do so.
  • Shade – Provide shade when workers request it and when temperatures exceed 80 degrees. Encourage workers to take a cool-down rest in the shade for at least five minutes. They should not wait until they feel sick to cool down.

Cal/OSHA urges workers experiencing possible overheating to take a preventative cool-down rest in the shade until symptoms are gone. Workers who have existing health problems or medical conditions that reduce tolerance to heat, such as diabetes, need to be extra vigilant. Some high blood pressure and anti-inflammatory medications can also increase a worker’s risk for heat illness.

In addition to the other requirements outlined in California’s heat illness prevention regulation, it is crucial that supervisors are effectively trained on emergency procedures in case a worker does get sick. This helps ensure sick employees receive treatment immediately and that the symptoms do not develop into a serious illness or death.

Cal/OSHA’s Heat Illness Prevention special emphasis program, the first of its kind in the nation, includes enforcement of heat regulations as well as multilingual outreach and training programs for California’s employers and workers. Online information on heat illness prevention requirements and training materials are available on Cal/OSHA’s Heat Illness Prevention web page and the Water. Rest. Shade. campaign site. A Heat Illness Prevention e-tool is also available on Cal/OSHA’s website.

For indoor workers in California, All In One Posters has also put together a California Indoor Heat Stress Poster seen below. This poster was created in response to a bill that was signed by Governor Brown in which section 6720 was added to SB 1167 to add protection for indoor workers against indoor heat.

All in One Posters - California Heat Illness Prevention for Indoor Working Environments

On-the-job heat exposure is a risk during operations involving high air temperatures, radiant heat sources, high humidity, direct physical contact with hot objects, or strenuous physical activities. Affected workplaces may include foundries, brick-firing and ceramic plants, glass products facilities, rubber products plants, electric utilities, commercial kitchens, laundries, chemical plants, and smelters.

OSHA emphasizes that while thousands of workers become sick each year from occupational heat exposure, the illnesses and deaths that can result are preventable.

All in One Poster Company designed the California Heat Illness Prevention for Indoor Work Environments to address this problem. Our poster contains steps to prevent heat illness, types of heat illnesses and treatments, and steps that both employees and employers can take to address this issue and create a plan of action.

Advertisements

Cal/OSHA Cites Roofing Contractor for Repeat Fall Hazard Violations

San Diego—Cal/OSHA cited California Premier Roofscapes, Inc. for repeat violations
of fall protection safety orders and proposed $134,454 in penalties. The Escondido based
company was investigated and cited on six different occasions over the past four years for putting its workers at risk of fatal falls.

Cal/OSHA opened the most recent inspection in August of 2017 after receiving a report
that workers were not wearing proper fall protection while installing tiles on the roof of a three-story Chula Vista home. Inspectors found that California Premier Roofscapes
failed to ensure their workers were wearing safety harnesses and other personal fall
protection. Employees were not properly trained on fall protection and roof work
hazards.

  • “California Premier Roofscapes has repeatedly put its workers at risk of potentially
    deadly falls from heights, disregarding basic safety requirements to protect its
    employees,” said Cal/OSHA Chief Juliann Sum.

Cal/OSHA issued citations to California Premier Roofscapes for four violations
including:

  • One repeat-serious violation for failing to ensure that workers were wearing fall
    protection.
  • One repeat general violation for failing to effectively implement and maintain a
    written Injury and Illness Prevention Program.
  • Two general violations for not inspecting equipment prior to each use and inadequate training on fall hazards and protection.

The first inspection with California Premier Roofscapes was opened in October 2014
after Cal/OSHA received a complaint that employees were working on an Irvine roof
with no fall protection. Cal/OSHA inspected a California Premier Roofscapes’ residential
construction site in Azusa the following day after receiving a complaint involving an
unsafe portable ladder. The following month, Cal/OSHA investigated an accident
involving a worker who suffered serious head and knee injuries after falling 15 feet from
a ladder attached to scaffolding at a Carlsbad residential construction site.

In June 2015, Cal/OSHA opened an inspection and cited California Premier Roofscapes
for a repeat serious violation after workers with no fall protection were reported on the
roof of an Irvine construction site. In March of the following year, Cal/OSHA inspected a
report that California Premier Roofscapes’ workers wore harnesses but were not
properly tied off to prevent falls from the roof of a Tustin construction site. California
Premier Roofscapes was cited for two repeat violations, one serious and one general
category.

Falls are the leading cause of death in construction nationwide. In California’s roofing
industry, falls have caused nine deaths and 162 serious injuries since 2014.

A serious violation is cited when there is a realistic possibility that death or serious harm
could result from the actual hazardous condition. A repeat violation is cited when the
employer was previously cited for the same or a very similar violation and the earlier
citation became final within the past 5 years.

All employers in California are required to have an effective written injury and illness
prevention program, a safety program to identify, assess and control hazards in the
workplace. Cal/OSHA has online tools and publications to guide employers on how to
establish an effective safety program. Cal/OSHA’s resources on fall protection include
safety and health factsheets, residential fall protection training and a construction safety
pocket guide.

Cal/OSHA helps protect workers from health and safety hazards on the job in almost
every workplace in California. Cal/OSHA’s Consultation Services Branch provides free
and voluntary assistance to employers to improve their health and safety programs.
Employers should call (800) 963-9424 for assistance from Cal/OSHA Consultation
Services.

Employees with work-related questions or complaints may contact DIR’s Call Center in
English or Spanish at 844-LABOR-DIR (844-522-6734). The California Workers’
Information line at 866-924-9757 provides recorded information in English and Spanish
on a variety of work-related topics. Complaints can also be filed confidentially with
Cal/OSHA district offices.

Source: https://www.dir.ca.gov/DIRNews/2018/2018-28.pdf

Proposed OSHA Rule for California Indoor Heat Illness Protection due January 1, 2019

On September 29, 2016, Governor Brown signed a bill that directs Cal/OSHA to create a regulation protecting employees of indoor workplaces from heat illness. Section 6720 was added to SB 1167 requiring that a proposed rule be submitted to Cal/OSHA Standards Board by January 1, 2019. The standard would apply to all indoor work areas where the temperature equals or exceeds 80 degrees Fahrenheit when employees are present.

In November 2015, the California Occupational Safety and Health Appeals Board has ruled in favor of Cal/OSHA’s citations against two employers because their Injury and Illness Prevention Programs (IIPP) failed to effectively address the hazard of indoor heat.

“This is the first case of indoor heat considered by the Appeals Board. In this case, the ruling affirms that California’s IIPP standard can be used to address hazards that the standard does not specifically identify, including indoor heat,” said Christine Baker, Director of the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR).

On-the-job heat exposure is a risk during operations involving high air temperatures, radiant heat sources, high humidity, direct physical contact with hot objects, or strenuous physical activities. Affected workplaces may include foundries, brick-firing and ceramic plants, glass products facilities, rubber products plants, electric utilities, commercial kitchens, laundries, chemical plants, and smelters.

OSHA emphasizes that while thousands of workers become sick each year from occupational heat exposure, the illnesses and deaths that can result are preventable.

All in One Poster Company designed the California Heat Illness Prevention for Indoor Work Environments to address this requirement. Our poster contains steps to prevent heat illness, types of heat illnesses and treatments, and steps that both employees and employers can take to address this issue and create a plan of action. Our easy-to-read, laminated poster is designed to supplement the mandatory training that will be required by the Cal/OSHA standard. It can also be used as a quick reference guide in preventing heat stress, heat exhaustion, heat stroke, or even death.

Our California Heat Illness Prevention for Indoor Work Environments Poster is available in both English and Spanish, and measures 24″ x 39″.

All in One Posters - California Heat Illness Prevention for Indoor Working Environments

Rhode Island: Mandated Short Term Disability Rates Increase

Weekly Maximum and Minimum Benefit Rates Increase

Rhode Island has announced that its weekly maximum and minimum short term disability rates have increased.

Background
Rhode Island’s temporary disability insurance program provides income support to individuals who are out of work because of a non-work related illness or injury. To be eligible, an individual must meet certain earnings requirements and be medically certified by a qualified health care provider as unable to work.

An individual’s weekly benefit rate will be equal to 4.62% of the wages paid in the highest quarter of his or her base period.

Updated Rates
For claims with a “Benefit Year Begin Date” of July 3, 2016 or later,$89.00 is the minimum benefit rate and $817.00 is the maximum benefit rate. This does not include dependency allowance. The weekly benefit rate remains the same throughout the entire benefit year.

Click here for more information on Rhode Island’s temporary disability program.

Originally Published by HR 360, Inc.

DOL Issues Guidance for Private Employers on Final Overtime Rule

Guidance Provides Options for Compliance

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has released guidance on its final overtime rule to help private sector employers evaluate current practices and transition to the rule’s requirements.

Background
The DOL’s final rule, effective December 1, 2016, updates the regulations governing which executive, administrative, and professional employees (“white collar” workers) are entitled to the minimum wage and overtime pay protections of the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). The rule focuses primarily on updating the salary and compensation levelsneeded for such workers to be exempt. In particular, the final rule:

  • Raises the salary threshold from $455 a week to $913 per week (or$47,476 annually) for a full-year worker;
  • Sets the highly-compensated employee (HCE) total annual compensation level equal to $134,004 annually;
  • Establishes a mechanism for automatically updating the salary and compensation levels every 3 years, beginning on January 1, 2020; and
  • Amends the regulations to allow employers to use nondiscretionary bonuses, incentives, and commissions to satisfy up to 10% of the new standard salary level, so long asemployers pay those amounts on a quarterly or more frequent basis.

Note: When both the FLSA and a state law apply, the employee is entitled to the most favorable provisions of each law.

New Guidance
Among other things, the DOL’s guidance details some of the options employers may exercise in determining how to comply with the final rule. Employers have certain options for responding to the changes to the salary level, and the DOL does not dictate or recommend any method. Such options include:

  • Providing pay raises that increase workers’ salaries to the new threshold;
  • Spreading employment by reducing or eliminating work hours of individual employees working over 40 hours per week for which no overtime is being paid; or
  • Paying overtime.

Note: The rule does not require employers to convert a salaried worker making less than the new salary threshold to hourly status; employers can pay non-exempt employees on a salary basis and pay overtime for hours worked beyond 40 in a week.

Click here to read the guidance. Additional information on the final rule, including fact sheets and Q&As, is available on the DOL’s final rule webpage.

Originally Published by HR 360, Inc.

San Francisco: Minimum Wage Rises to $13.00 Per Hour on July 1, 2016

As a reminder, the San Francisco minimum wage will rise to $13.00 per hour san-francisco-ordinances-non-laminated-minimum-wage-paid-sick-hcso-fair-chance-family-friendly-imagebeginning July 1, 2016. A new poster reflecting the updated rate (in multiple languages) is now available by clicking here.

Future Minimum Wage Increases in San Francisco
Additional raises are expected according to the following schedule:

  • $14.00 per hour beginning on July 1, 2017;
  • $15.00 per hour beginning on July 1, 2018; and
  • Increased annually by an amount corresponding to the prior year’s increase (if any) in the Consumer Price Index beginning on July 1, 2019.

Click here for more information.

ORIGINALLY POSTED BY HR360

California: New Laws Expand Coverage of Workplace Smoking Prohibitions

E-Cigarettes Included in Workplace Smoking Prohibitions

Several recent pieces of legislation, generally effective on June 9, 2016, expand coverage of California’s workplace smoking prohibitions.

Electronic Cigarettes NoVaping.gif

  • A new law recasts and broadens the definition of “tobacco product” under state law to include electronic cigarettes. By broadening the definition of “tobacco products,” the new measure extends existing laws that relate to tobacco products (e.g., workplace smoking laws) to electronic cigarettes.
    • Note: The law also states that certain retailers of tobacco products (including electronic cigarettes), which are not subject to a tobacco tax, must apply for a license and pay an annual license fee of $265, beginning January 1, 2017. Additional details and obligations are described in the law.

Workplace Smoking Prohibitions Expanded

  • An additional measure amends the state’s workplace smoking law to cover additional places. Key changes include the following:
    • Owner-Operated Businesses. The law extends the workplace smoking prohibition to include owner-operated businesses in which the owner-operator is the only worker and there are no employees, independent contractors, or volunteers.
    • Covered Parking Lots. The law expands the definition of “enclosed space” where smoking is prohibited to include covered parking lots.
    • Guestroom Accommodations. The law reduces to 20% (from 65%) the amount of guestroom accommodations in a hotel, motel, or similar transient lodging establishment in which smoking is allowed.
    • Additional Smoke-Free Locations. The measure eliminates several exemptions in the law which (until June 9, 2016) allow the smoking of tobacco products in certain work environments. As such, the smoking of tobacco products is prohibited at the following locations:
      • Hotel or motel lobbies;
      • Meeting and banquet rooms in a hotel or motel;
      • Warehouse facilities;
      • Gaming clubs;
      • Bars and taverns;
      • Employee break rooms; and
      • Businesses with a total of 5 or fewer employees.

Employers may review the text of the new laws regarding electronic cigarettes and workplace smoking for additional details.

ORIGINALLY POSTED BY WWW.HR360.COM

OSHA Requires Certain Employers to Electronically Submit Injury and Illness Data

Fact Sheet and FAQs Available

The U.S. Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) has issued a final rule that (among other things) requires certain employers toelectronically submit injury and illness data.

Background
Under OSHA’s recordkeeping regulation, employers with more than 10 employees and whose establishments are not classified as a partially exempt industry generally must record work-related injuries and illnesses that meet certain criteria using OSHA Forms 300, 300A, and 301. In addition, such employers are required to post Form 300A,Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses, from February 1 – April 30 of each year. Employers with 10 or fewer employees—regardless of their industry classification—are exempt from the requirement to routinely keep records of worker injuries and illnesses.

Final Rule
The new rule, generally effective January 1, 2017, requires certain employers to electronically submit injury and illness data to OSHA that they are already required to record on their OSHA injury and illness forms, as follows:

  • Establishments with 250 or more employees in industries covered by the recordkeeping regulation must submit information from their2016 Forms 300A by July 1, 2017. These same employers will be required to submit information from all 2017 forms (300A, 300, and 301) by July 1, 2018. Beginning in 2019, the information must be submitted by March 2.
  • Establishments with 20-249 employees in certain high-risk industriesmust submit information from their 2016 Forms 300A by July 1, 2017, and their 2017 Forms 300A by July 1, 2018. Beginning in 2019, the information must be submitted by March 2.
  • Establishments with fewer than 20 employees at all times during the year do not have to routinely submit information electronically to OSHA (however, employers with more than 10 employees and whose establishments are not classified as a partially exempt industry must otherwise comply with applicable OSHA recordkeeping provisions).

Note: OSHA “State Plan” states must adopt requirements that are substantially identical to the requirements in the final rule within 6 months after the rule’s publication (listed as May 12, 2016).

Further details and requirements are contained in the final rule. Additional resources, such as a fact sheet and FAQs, are available by clicking here.

 

ORIGINALLY POSTED BY WWW.HR360.COM

Beware of Scam Targeting Small Businesses through Mailers and “Inspectors”

Inspector and Mailer Heading PhotoAll in One Poster Company, Inc would like to warn its customers as well as other small business owners to avoid mass mailer scams informing them that their labor law posters are outdated while pressuring them to purchase an overpriced product for their employee and business.

These mailers are false, misleading, deceptive and even threatening. As a part of this scam, business owners are demanded to pay varying amounts that range from $65 to $285 or face fines up to $17,000.

One mailer is marked with the company name “Corporate Compliance Services” and labeled “Labor Law Compliance Request Form.” Several businesses who receive these notices are just starting up and have yet to have any employees, and therefore are not required to post such information. Even when posting is required, the individual notices are provided at no charge by the U.S. Department of Labor as well as various agencies within your state’s labor department.Corporate Compliance Services Mailer

Another mailer comes from a “PCI – Customer Compliance Department” and is marked “Compliance Update 2016 (or current year) – URGENT”. Inside this mailer, an imposing phrase in bold letters says, “SUSPENSION OF COVERAGE” greets the unsuspecting reader. In a different strategy, this mailer actually offers similar posters at a much lower price of $10 for a non-laminated version and an extra $9.95 for lamination. Given that this mailer might get a much larger response due to pricing, the company comes back at the unsuspecting customer with an invoice that is well over $100, adding posters that they claim are also required. This company also makes constant phone calls to companies, whose information they most likely obtained through purchasing leads from the state. Please note that although this company uses “AIO Acquisition, Inc” as one of its several names, and calls its products as “Space Saver All-On-One Poster”, it is in no way affiliated with All In One Poster Company, Inc.Personnel Concepts Mailer2

Lastly, All in One Posters would like to warn against people posing as agents or “inspectors” who visit small businesses and threaten unknowing owners with fines and citations due to missing labor law posters, which they just so happen to be selling! Even if they show you a fake ID or citation sheet claiming they represent the “compliance department”, remember that real government inspectors DO NOT SELL POSTERS! Do not be fooled. Again, sole proprietors and business owners who have no employees, are not required to post labor law posters.

Related article: How do you know if your labor law posters are up to date? When you are one of our customers, you don’t have to worry!

 

Fake Inspectors2

Cal/OSHA Cites Tree Service Company for Fatal Safety Breach

Chainsaw LanyardRedding—Cal/OSHA has cited Wright Tree Service of the West, Inc. for serious safety violations following an investigation into a fatal tree-trimming accident in Humboldt County near Weitchpec. The proposed penalties total $31,750.

On December 30, 2015, Kenneth A. Williams, a foreman with Wright Tree Services of the West, died while trimming a bay laurel tree on Rock Ranch Road. Although Williams was using a flipline lanyard to secure himself to the tree, it had only one point of attachment when regulations require two. Williams was killed when he accidentally cut the lanyard with the chainsaw he was operating and fell 54 feet.

Cal/OSHA’s investigation revealed the employer had failed to ensure that workers were using a second point of attachment to secure the worker when operating a chain saw in a tree. Also, workers’ clothing, equipment and procedures failed to meet safety standards.

“Tree work involves many hazards, and employers must develop and implement safety procedures and train their employees to prevent accidents,” said Cal/OSHA Chief Juliann Sum. “Most accidents can be prevented.”

Both citations in this case were classified as serious. Serious violations are cited when there is a realistic possibility that death or serious physical harm could result from the actual hazard created by the violation.

Failure to develop and implement appropriate safety procedures is one of the major causes of serious workplace injury and death in California. Accidents related to tree work can result in severe traumatic injuries and death. Twelve fatal accidents related to tree work have been reported to Cal/OSHA since May 2015.

Commonly reported accidents include falls, electrocutions, and those caused by falling objects. Most accidents can be prevented by recognizing and controlling hazards in advance as well as training employees on safe work practices and effective use of personal protective equipment. Cal/OSHA offers a fact sheet on tree work safety.