Pasadena California Gets Minimum Wage Increase This July 1, 2018

Beginning July 1, 2018, employers with 26 or more employees must pay wages of not less than $13.25 per hour (in addition to any tips received) to each employee. For employers with 25 or less employees, the minimum wage is $12.00 per hour.

The official posters must be posted in a conspicuous place, accessible to all employees, where the other state and federal labor law posters are also posted. They can be downloaded below:

Pasadena 25 or less

25 or less employees

Pasadena 26 or more

26 or more employees

The minimum wage requirement set forth in the Pasadena Minimum Wage Ordinance applies to adult and minor employees who work two (2) or more hours per week in Pasadena.

Under the Ordinance, employees who assert their rights to receive the City’s minimum wage are protected from retaliation. Employees may file a civil lawsuit against their employers for any violation of the Ordinance or may file a complaint with the City’s Department of Planning and Community Development. The City will investigate possible violations and, where appropriate, will obtain payroll records as provided by law, and will enforce violations of the minimum wage requirements by ordering reinstatement of employees, payment of back wages unlawfully withheld, and penalties. In addition, any business that violates the provisions of the Pasadena Minimum Wage Ordinance is subject to criminal prosecution.

 

What Is My California Wage Order?

The California Industrial Welfare Commission (IWC) Wage Orders regulate wages, hours, and working conditions.  Employers must comply with the IWC Wage Order and California and Federal labor laws applicable to their business or industry.

For example, IWC Wage Order 1 applies to the manufacturing industry; Wage Order 4 applies to professional, technical, clerical, mechanical and similar occupations; Wage Order 7 applies to the mercantile industry; Wage Order 9 applies to the transportation industry; Wage Order 12 applies to the motion picture industry; Wage Order 14 applies to agricultural occupations; Wage Order 15 applies to household occupations; and Wage Order 16 applies to occupations in the construction, drilling, logging and mining industries.

Here are several things you need to know about the IWC Wage Order:

  • It is required for ALL employers in California to post a copy of the correct IWC Wage Order Poster under Labor Code 1183(d);
  • It is enforced by the California Labor Commissioner’s Office/Division of Labor Standards Enforcement (DLSE);
  • It is the number one required poster on the state’s list of required notices, listed even before the contents of our California and Federal Combination Poster;
  • It states at the very top of the California Minimum Wage notice, “Please post next to your IWC Industry or Occupation Order”.

The California Labor Commissioner’s Office, also known as the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement or DLSE, has created a pamphlet called “WHICH IWC ORDER?  Classifications” to assists employers and employees in determining which IWC Wage Order applies to a business or employee (available at http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/WhichIWCOrderClassifications.PDF).

Each California Wage Order covers regulations on topics such as:

  • Administrative, executive and professional exemptions;
  • Overtime wages;
  • Alternative workweeks;
  • Minimum wages;
  • Reporting time pay;
  • Records retention;
  • Cash shortage and breakage;
  • Uniforms and equipment;
  • Meals and lodging;
  • Meal periods;
  • Rest periods; and
  • Required posting of the order.

The Industrial Welfare Commission (IWC) provides 17 different California Wage Orders. However, the DLSE has not made a determination as to who is classified under the 17th Wage Order – Miscellaneous Employees. Every California employer should know the applicable Wage Order for her/his/its business and employees and the regulations regarding wages, hours and working conditions contained therein.

Here is a list of the 16 different IWC Wage Orders, excluding the one for miscellaneous employees.

(1) Manufacturing Industry (9) Transportation Industry
(2) Personal Services
(gyms, hair and nail salons, massage parlor, etc)
(10) Amusement & Recreation Industry (Amusement Parks, Bowling Alleys, Golf Courses, Ski Resorts, etc.)
(3) Canning, Freezing & Preserving Industry (11) Broadcasting Industry
(Broadcasting and Taping, TV and Radio Broadcasting)
(4) Professional, Technical, Clerical, Mechanical, and Similar Occupations
Teachers, Engineers, Real Estate Brokerage, Financial Firms, Legal Firms, Professional Firms, Travel Agencies, Non-Profit, Government Employees, etc.)
(12) Motion Picture Industry
(Film, TV, Video Production, Advertising Films, Casting, Wardrobe and Property Rental for Production, etc.)
(5) Public Housekeeping Industry (Restaurants, Hotels, Hospitals, Nursing Homes, Public Storage, Grounds and Property Maintenance, Schools with Dormitories, etc) (13) Agricultural Products for Market, On The Farm
(packing, processing, slaughtering, nut hulling/shelling/cracking, etc. when done on grower’s own land and product)
(6) Laundry, Linen Supply, Dry Cleaning and Dyeing Industry (14) Agricultural Occupations
(Field Workers, Fish Hatcheries, Wranglers, Cowboys/Cowgirls, etc.)
(7) Mercantile Industry
(purchasing, selling, or distributing goods or commodities at retail or Wholesale, or renting goods or commodities)
(15) Household Occupations
(Day Workers, Employees of private households)
(8) Industries handling products after harvest (not on the farm) (16) On-Site Construction, Mining, Drilling, Landscaping Industry

For the convenience of our valued customers, All In One Poster Company has created an all-in-one version of the California IWC Wage Order Poster, available in a 24″ x 39″ laminated poster format that can be purchased by itself, or as part of our California Packages that include a California & Federal Combination Poster.

Note: California employers must also comply with additional applicable local requirements, which might include city-specific minimum wage requirements that may be higher than the state minimum wage. All in One Posters has created this page that lists some of the major local posting requirements.

This article is intended as a guide in determining the classifications of businesses and occupations under the Industrial Welfare Commission Orders. These guidelines and classifications of employees are general in nature and the existence of specific facts and circumstances of the employment relationship and operations of a particular employer may require a different determination of proper classification that the general one set forth herein. As new types of businesses and occupations are constantly coming
into existence, there undoubtedly are businesses and occupations that have not been included on the state’s classification index. Additionally, as industry practices and business structures evolve, circumstances may dictate the change in classification of a particular occupation from one wage order to another wage order.

Univ. of California system raises minimum wage to $13 an hour

University of California CollageThe first phase of a law that will eventually boost the minimum wage of all University of California employees to $15 an hour went into effect on Thursday.

The UC system is the first in the country to voluntarily create a plan for a $15 minimum wage, according to a university statement emailed on Thursday.Now, all university employees working 20 or more hours per week will earn at least $13 an hour. That wage is expected to increase to $14 an hour on Oct. 1 of 2016 and reach its target of $15 an hour on Oct. 1 the following year.

According to the UC website, the system employs 190,000 workers, though only a small fraction of workers will benefit from the program as the program only impacts those workers receiving an hourly wage.

According to NPR, the full policy is set to affect 3,200 employees in the University of California system. However, the total number affected could actually be higher, as any third party contracted by UC for services will earn the required wage, also according to the system’s website.

LOS ANGELES, CA - JULY 15:  University of California employees represented by the Union Coalition demonstrate in front of UCLA Ronald Reagan Medical Center to call on University of California executives take a pay cut instead of reducing services to patients, cutting employee hours and increasing student tuition on July 15, 2009 in the Westwood area of Los Angeles, California. As California continues to make history drastic cuts to state funds to get a handle on the state budget crises, union officials say that UC administrators have declined to give them budget information that shows reduced hours and services are needed. Pending reductions in work hours and services may affect as many as 150,000 public employees at all 10 University of California campuses.   (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

LOS ANGELES, CA – JULY 15: University of California employees represented by the Union Coalition demonstrate in front of UCLA Ronald Reagan Medical Center to call on University of California executives take a pay cut instead of reducing services to patients, cutting employee hours and increasing student tuition on July 15, 2009 in the Westwood area of Los Angeles, California. As California continues to make history drastic cuts to state funds to get a handle on the state budget crises, union officials say that UC administrators have declined to give them budget information that shows reduced hours and services are needed. Pending reductions in work hours and services may affect as many as 150,000 public employees at all 10 University of California campuses. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

“This is the right thing to do — for our workers and their families, for our mission and values, and to enhance UC’s leadership role by becoming the first public university in the United States to voluntarily establish a minimum wage of 15 dollars,” UC President Janet Napolitano said when the plan was first announced.

The UC system’s website states the school will fund the cost of the extra wages through “non-core funds, including sales and revenue,” which will not include tuition or state resources. Employees can report wage or working conditions via a hotline, an online complaint system or periodic and annual audits.

The move comes in the midst of a national debate about the value of a minimum wage increase.

Michael Schramm is a student at the University of Michigan and USA TODAY College breaking news correspondent.