Child Labor in the District of Columbia (DC)

Both state and federal law restrict the employment of minors. When state youth employment laws differ from the federal provisions, an employer must comply with the higher standard. State child labor standards are presented below.

Minimum Wage

Individuals under the age of 18 may be paid the minimum wage established by the federal government.

Marion S. Barry Summer Youth Employment Expansion Amendment Act

The District of Columbia recently amended the Youth Employment Act to authorize the mayor to provide employment or work-readiness training for participants 14 through 24 years of age (prior to this law, only youths aged 14 to 21 were eligible to participate).

Specifically, the law provides that the mayor must establish and implement (subject to the annual appropriation of funds) a summer youth jobs program to provide for the employment or training each summer of 10,000 to 21,000 youth. Youth must be 14 through 21 years of age on the date of enrollment in the program; provided, that forFiscal Year 2016 and Fiscal Year 2017, the program may provide for the employment or training each summer of no more than 1,000 youth22 through 24 years of age on the date of enrollment in the program.

Individuals involved in the program must be paid at the following rates:

  • Youth 14 or 15 years of age at the date of enrollment must receive an hourly work readiness training rate of at least $5.25.
  • Youth 16 through 21 years of age at the date of enrollment must be compensated at an hourly rate of $8.25.
  • Youth 22 through 24 years of age at the date of enrollment must be compensated at no less than the District’s minimum wage, or the federal minimum wage plus $1 (if the federal minimum wage is greater than the DC minimum hourly wage).

These provisions are effective as of May 12, 2016. Click here to read the text of the law.

Restrictions on Time & Hours Worked

Minors under 18 are generally prohibited from working:

  • More than 6 consecutive days in any 1 week;
  • More than 48 hours in any 1 week; or
  • More than 8 hours in any 1 day.

Note: Certain minors in agricultural work, housework, or in the distribution or sale of newspapers are exempt from these requirements. Different requirements may apply to minors employed in certain live performances or minors employed stuffing newspapers.

Minors 16 and 17 Years Old

  • Minors 16 or 17 years of age may not be employed, permitted, or suffered to work before 6:00 a.m. or after 10:00 p.m.

Minors Under 16

  • Minors under 16 years of age may not be employed, permitted, or suffered to work before 7:00 a.m. or after 7:00 p.m., except during the summer (June 1 through Labor Day) when such minors may work until 9:00 p.m.

For More Information

Please Note: The state laws summaries featured on this site are for general informational purposes only. In addition to state law, certain municipalities may enact legislation that imposes different requirements. State and local laws change frequently and, as such, we cannot guarantee the accuracy or completeness of the information featured in the State Laws section. For more detailed information regarding state or local laws, please contact your state labor department or the appropriate local government agency.

 

ORIGINALLY POSTED BY HR360