$15 Per Hour is here. Updated San Francisco Employment Poster for July 1, 2018 Now Available.

Our City of San Francisco Ordinances Poster has been updated with the latest change to the San Francisco Minimum Wage, which will be $15/hour as of July 1, 2018.

In addition, our poster also now includes the new Salary History Ordinance. The ordinance  bans employers, including City contractors and subcontractors, from considering current or past salary of an applicant in determining whether to hire the applicant or what salary to offer the applicant.

The ordinance also prohibits employers from (1) asking applicants about their current or past salary or (2) disclosing a current or former employee’s salary history without that employee’s authorization unless the salary history is publicly available.

Posters purchased on or after June 1st 2018 will have these changes included.

The poster is available in a regular version, as well as a city-contractor version for companies that hold contracts with the city/county of San Francisco.

You may click on the image below to purchase your poster. Thank you for your business.

2018 San Francisco City Poster

City of Emeryville CA Minimum Wage Increase Takes Effect July 1, 2018

New Rates for Small and Large Employers

Effective July 1, 2018, the minimum wage in Emeryville, California will rise to $15.00 per hour for small businesses (55 or fewer employees) and to $15.69 per hour for large businesses (56 or more employees). Paid sick leave requirements will remain the same.

Click here for more information.

San Francisco Employers Annual Reporting Form Due April 30, 2018

Employers covered by San Francisco’s Health Care Security Ordinance (HCSO) and/or the Fair Chance Ordinance (FCO) are required to submit the 2017 Employer Annual Reporting Form to the Office of Labor Standards Enforcement by April 30, 2018.

Coverage
Employers may determine whether they are required to submit the form by filling out this survey. Employers who were not covered by the HCSO or the FCO in 2017 will be directed to a page indicating that they do not need to submit the form. Covered employers will be directed to the appropriate online form.

Covered employers should review the instructions before beginning the online form. A PDF preview of the form is also available.

Click here for additional resources on the reporting requirement.

For more information on the HCSO and FCO, employers may visit the city’s website.

Originally Posted by HR360

What Is My California Wage Order?

The California Industrial Welfare Commission (IWC) Wage Orders regulate wages, hours, and working conditions.  Employers must comply with the IWC Wage Order and California and Federal labor laws applicable to their business or industry.

For example, IWC Wage Order 1 applies to the manufacturing industry; Wage Order 4 applies to professional, technical, clerical, mechanical and similar occupations; Wage Order 7 applies to the mercantile industry; Wage Order 9 applies to the transportation industry; Wage Order 12 applies to the motion picture industry; Wage Order 14 applies to agricultural occupations; Wage Order 15 applies to household occupations; and Wage Order 16 applies to occupations in the construction, drilling, logging and mining industries.

Here are several things you need to know about the IWC Wage Order:

  • It is required for ALL employers in California to post a copy of the correct IWC Wage Order Poster under Labor Code 1183(d);
  • It is enforced by the California Labor Commissioner’s Office/Division of Labor Standards Enforcement (DLSE);
  • It is the number one required poster on the state’s list of required notices, listed even before the contents of our California and Federal Combination Poster;
  • It states at the very top of the California Minimum Wage notice, “Please post next to your IWC Industry or Occupation Order”.

The California Labor Commissioner’s Office, also known as the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement or DLSE, has created a pamphlet called “WHICH IWC ORDER?  Classifications” to assists employers and employees in determining which IWC Wage Order applies to a business or employee (available at http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/WhichIWCOrderClassifications.PDF).

Each California Wage Order covers regulations on topics such as:

  • Administrative, executive and professional exemptions;
  • Overtime wages;
  • Alternative workweeks;
  • Minimum wages;
  • Reporting time pay;
  • Records retention;
  • Cash shortage and breakage;
  • Uniforms and equipment;
  • Meals and lodging;
  • Meal periods;
  • Rest periods; and
  • Required posting of the order.

The Industrial Welfare Commission (IWC) provides 17 different California Wage Orders. However, the DLSE has not made a determination as to who is classified under the 17th Wage Order – Miscellaneous Employees. Every California employer should know the applicable Wage Order for her/his/its business and employees and the regulations regarding wages, hours and working conditions contained therein.

Here is a list of the 16 different IWC Wage Orders, excluding the one for miscellaneous employees.

(1) Manufacturing Industry (9) Transportation Industry
(2) Personal Services
(gyms, hair and nail salons, massage parlor, etc)
(10) Amusement & Recreation Industry (Amusement Parks, Bowling Alleys, Golf Courses, Ski Resorts, etc.)
(3) Canning, Freezing & Preserving Industry (11) Broadcasting Industry
(Broadcasting and Taping, TV and Radio Broadcasting)
(4) Professional, Technical, Clerical, Mechanical, and Similar Occupations
Teachers, Engineers, Real Estate Brokerage, Financial Firms, Legal Firms, Professional Firms, Travel Agencies, Non-Profit, Government Employees, etc.)
(12) Motion Picture Industry
(Film, TV, Video Production, Advertising Films, Casting, Wardrobe and Property Rental for Production, etc.)
(5) Public Housekeeping Industry (Restaurants, Hotels, Hospitals, Nursing Homes, Public Storage, Grounds and Property Maintenance, Schools with Dormitories, etc) (13) Agricultural Products for Market, On The Farm
(packing, processing, slaughtering, nut hulling/shelling/cracking, etc. when done on grower’s own land and product)
(6) Laundry, Linen Supply, Dry Cleaning and Dyeing Industry (14) Agricultural Occupations
(Field Workers, Fish Hatcheries, Wranglers, Cowboys/Cowgirls, etc.)
(7) Mercantile Industry
(purchasing, selling, or distributing goods or commodities at retail or Wholesale, or renting goods or commodities)
(15) Household Occupations
(Day Workers, Employees of private households)
(8) Industries handling products after harvest (not on the farm) (16) On-Site Construction, Mining, Drilling, Landscaping Industry

For the convenience of our valued customers, All In One Poster Company has created an all-in-one version of the California IWC Wage Order Poster, available in a 24″ x 39″ laminated poster format that can be purchased by itself, or as part of our California Packages that include a California & Federal Combination Poster.

Note: California employers must also comply with additional applicable local requirements, which might include city-specific minimum wage requirements that may be higher than the state minimum wage. All in One Posters has created this page that lists some of the major local posting requirements.

This article is intended as a guide in determining the classifications of businesses and occupations under the Industrial Welfare Commission Orders. These guidelines and classifications of employees are general in nature and the existence of specific facts and circumstances of the employment relationship and operations of a particular employer may require a different determination of proper classification that the general one set forth herein. As new types of businesses and occupations are constantly coming
into existence, there undoubtedly are businesses and occupations that have not been included on the state’s classification index. Additionally, as industry practices and business structures evolve, circumstances may dictate the change in classification of a particular occupation from one wage order to another wage order.

San Francisco: Minimum Wage Rises to $13.00 Per Hour on July 1, 2016

As a reminder, the San Francisco minimum wage will rise to $13.00 per hour san-francisco-ordinances-non-laminated-minimum-wage-paid-sick-hcso-fair-chance-family-friendly-imagebeginning July 1, 2016. A new poster reflecting the updated rate (in multiple languages) is now available by clicking here.

Future Minimum Wage Increases in San Francisco
Additional raises are expected according to the following schedule:

  • $14.00 per hour beginning on July 1, 2017;
  • $15.00 per hour beginning on July 1, 2018; and
  • Increased annually by an amount corresponding to the prior year’s increase (if any) in the Consumer Price Index beginning on July 1, 2019.

Click here for more information.

ORIGINALLY POSTED BY HR360

San Francisco Issues Final Rules Implementing Retail Workers’ Bill of Rights

o-san-francisco-union-square-facebook1The San Francisco Office of Labor Standards Enforcement (OLSE) has issued final rules, effective March 1, 2016, implementing the Formula Retail Employee Rights Ordinances (sometimes known as the “Retail Workers’ Bill of Rights”).

Background
The two Formula Retail Employee Rights Ordinances (effective as of July 3, 2015) regulate hours, retention, and scheduling at some “formula retail establishments.” The ordinances apply to formula retail establishments (or chain stores) with at least 40 formula retail establishments worldwide and 20 or more employees in San Francisco, as well as their janitorial and security contractors.

Final Rules and Required Notice
The final rules implementing the ordinances include details on topics such as:

  • Determining whether a formula retail establishment has 20 or more employees;
  • Overtime pay and offers of additional hours to part-time employees;
  • Calculating an employee’s “regular hourly rate” under the law; and
  • Calculating predictability pay when an employer adds hours to or subtracts hours from a scheduled shift with less than 24-hours’ notice.

Additionally, the Formula Retail Employee Rights Notice is now available. Covered employers must post this notice in a conspicuous place at any workplace or job site where any of their covered employees work.

Additional details and examples are available in the text of the final rules. A fact sheet and FAQs are also available on the OLSE’s website.

To review other state laws specific to California, visit the State Lawssection, click on California, and choose your topic of interest from the left-hand navigation menu.

HR360 Editorial Team http://www.hr360.com

Oregon House votes to hike state minimum wage

Oregon lawmakers have set the state on course for a higher minimum wage.
On Thursday, the state’s House of Representatives voted 32-26 to raise the wage, which currently sits at $9.25 per hour.

While the bill will increase the minimum wage across the state, the extra cash workers will receive depends on where they are.
For instance, the Portland metropolitan area will begin with a minimum of $9.75 that will rise to $14.75 by 2022.
Jackson, Josephine, Deschutes, Wasco and Hood River counties, as well as the Willamette Valley Northwest Oregon, will start at the same rate as Portland but increase to $13.50 by 2022.
Workers in rural counties will get a minimum of $9.50 in July, going up to $12.50 by 2022.

The bill now goes to Gov. Kate Brown, who has been pushing for a minimum wage increase. She said in a statement she intended to sign the new legislation.
Activists have been pushing for minimum wages nationwide to be raised to $15.
Following the examples set by San Francisco and Seattle, 14 cities, counties and state governments have approved a hike to $15, according to the National Employment Law Project.
In most places, the increase to $15 is being phased in over a few years to give businesses some time to adjust.
CNNMoney (New York)
  @robertmclean
First published February 19, 2016: 12:33 AM ET

San Jose Minimum Wage Not Going Up In 2016 Due To Consumer Price Index Drop

SAN JOSE (KPIX 5) – Thousands of people who in San Jose who earn minimum wage thought they would be getting a raise on January 1st. But a lower Consumer Price Index means their wages will stay at $10.30 an hour next year.
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Emma Sanchez is among those earning minimum wage in San Jose. When asked how she tries to make ends meet, Sanchez said, “Stretch it out. It’s really hard.”

The mother of four said she is sometimes unable to pay her bills. “It’s , extra hours extra shifts,” Sanchez said. “You know, pulling ends here and there to do what you got to do just to make ends meet.”

San Jose voters passed an ordinance two years ago that allows for a jump in minimum wage if the Price Index goes up. But in the last 12 months, the CPI went down, because gas prices took a drop in August.

Although Sanchez lives in one of the most expensive cities in the country, the CPI is a U.S. city average.

“It’s not fair,” Sanchez said. “It’s getting harder and harder and minimum wage is not going to cut it anymore.”

Mayor Sam Liccardo said, “The mechanical of the existing ordinance is not helping.”

Liccardo said he wants to see an increase in minimum wage throughout Santa Clara County.

“There’s no question that the minimum wage at its current level is not enough to enable anyone to survive in this valley,” the mayor told KPIX 5.

For thousands like Sanchez, every penny counts when you’re making minimum wage. She said any increase in pay would help.

“It would help. It would extremely help not only me as a single mother but a lot of people it would help,” Sanchez said.

This is the first time since the ordinance was passed that the minimum wage has not gone up.

ORIGINALLY POSTED BY CBS SAN FRANCISCO