$15 Per Hour is here. Updated San Francisco Employment Poster for July 1, 2018 Now Available.

Our City of San Francisco Ordinances Poster has been updated with the latest change to the San Francisco Minimum Wage, which will be $15/hour as of July 1, 2018.

In addition, our poster also now includes the new Salary History Ordinance. The ordinance  bans employers, including City contractors and subcontractors, from considering current or past salary of an applicant in determining whether to hire the applicant or what salary to offer the applicant.

The ordinance also prohibits employers from (1) asking applicants about their current or past salary or (2) disclosing a current or former employee’s salary history without that employee’s authorization unless the salary history is publicly available.

Posters purchased on or after June 1st 2018 will have these changes included.

The poster is available in a regular version, as well as a city-contractor version for companies that hold contracts with the city/county of San Francisco.

You may click on the image below to purchase your poster. Thank you for your business.

2018 San Francisco City Poster

DOL Revises Federal Minimum Wage and Employee Polygraph Workplace Posters

2016 Federal Banner for Blog
Revised Posters Must Be Posted as of August 1, 2016

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has recently updated its Fair Labor Standards Act and Employee Polygraph Protection Act posters. The new versions are now included in our State & Federal Combination Posters, as well as various versions of our Federal All-In-One Posters.

Background
The federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) establishes minimum wage, overtime pay, recordkeeping, and youth employment standards. Covered nonexempt workers are entitled to at least the federal minimum wage, and overtime pay at a rate not less than one and one-half times the regular rate of pay is required after 40 hours of work in a workweek.

Note: Employers may also have certain obligations under state and/or local laws, including minimum wage and overtime pay requirements. When both the FLSA and a state law apply, the employee is entitled to the most favorable provisions of each law.

The federal Employee Polygraph Protection Act (EPPA) prohibits most private employers from using lie detector tests, either for pre-employment screening or during the course of employment. Employers generally may not require or request any employee or job applicant to take a lie detector test, or discharge, discipline, or discriminate against an employee or job applicant for refusing to take a test.

Revised Posters
Every employer of employees subject to the FLSA’s minimum wage provisions must post (and keep posted) a notice explaining the law in a conspicuous place in all of their establishments so as to permit employees to readily read it.

Additionally, every employer subject to the EPPA must post (and keep posted) on its premises a notice explaining the law. The notice must be posted in a prominent and conspicuous place in every establishment of the employer where it can readily be observed by employees and applicants for employment.

As of August 1, 2016, employers must post these revised versions. All In One Poster Company has revised all posters containing these notices as of July 29, 2016.

San Francisco: Minimum Wage Rises to $13.00 Per Hour on July 1, 2016

As a reminder, the San Francisco minimum wage will rise to $13.00 per hour san-francisco-ordinances-non-laminated-minimum-wage-paid-sick-hcso-fair-chance-family-friendly-imagebeginning July 1, 2016. A new poster reflecting the updated rate (in multiple languages) is now available by clicking here.

Future Minimum Wage Increases in San Francisco
Additional raises are expected according to the following schedule:

  • $14.00 per hour beginning on July 1, 2017;
  • $15.00 per hour beginning on July 1, 2018; and
  • Increased annually by an amount corresponding to the prior year’s increase (if any) in the Consumer Price Index beginning on July 1, 2019.

Click here for more information.

ORIGINALLY POSTED BY HR360

San Francisco Issues Final Rules Implementing Retail Workers’ Bill of Rights

o-san-francisco-union-square-facebook1The San Francisco Office of Labor Standards Enforcement (OLSE) has issued final rules, effective March 1, 2016, implementing the Formula Retail Employee Rights Ordinances (sometimes known as the “Retail Workers’ Bill of Rights”).

Background
The two Formula Retail Employee Rights Ordinances (effective as of July 3, 2015) regulate hours, retention, and scheduling at some “formula retail establishments.” The ordinances apply to formula retail establishments (or chain stores) with at least 40 formula retail establishments worldwide and 20 or more employees in San Francisco, as well as their janitorial and security contractors.

Final Rules and Required Notice
The final rules implementing the ordinances include details on topics such as:

  • Determining whether a formula retail establishment has 20 or more employees;
  • Overtime pay and offers of additional hours to part-time employees;
  • Calculating an employee’s “regular hourly rate” under the law; and
  • Calculating predictability pay when an employer adds hours to or subtracts hours from a scheduled shift with less than 24-hours’ notice.

Additionally, the Formula Retail Employee Rights Notice is now available. Covered employers must post this notice in a conspicuous place at any workplace or job site where any of their covered employees work.

Additional details and examples are available in the text of the final rules. A fact sheet and FAQs are also available on the OLSE’s website.

To review other state laws specific to California, visit the State Lawssection, click on California, and choose your topic of interest from the left-hand navigation menu.

HR360 Editorial Team http://www.hr360.com

Oregon House votes to hike state minimum wage

Oregon lawmakers have set the state on course for a higher minimum wage.
On Thursday, the state’s House of Representatives voted 32-26 to raise the wage, which currently sits at $9.25 per hour.

While the bill will increase the minimum wage across the state, the extra cash workers will receive depends on where they are.
For instance, the Portland metropolitan area will begin with a minimum of $9.75 that will rise to $14.75 by 2022.
Jackson, Josephine, Deschutes, Wasco and Hood River counties, as well as the Willamette Valley Northwest Oregon, will start at the same rate as Portland but increase to $13.50 by 2022.
Workers in rural counties will get a minimum of $9.50 in July, going up to $12.50 by 2022.

The bill now goes to Gov. Kate Brown, who has been pushing for a minimum wage increase. She said in a statement she intended to sign the new legislation.
Activists have been pushing for minimum wages nationwide to be raised to $15.
Following the examples set by San Francisco and Seattle, 14 cities, counties and state governments have approved a hike to $15, according to the National Employment Law Project.
In most places, the increase to $15 is being phased in over a few years to give businesses some time to adjust.
CNNMoney (New York)
  @robertmclean
First published February 19, 2016: 12:33 AM ET

Labor Commissioner Gets San Francisco House Cleaning Workers $50,000 Each in Back Pay

ClearningSan Francisco—Labor Commissioner Julie A. Su has reached a $265,000 settlement on behalf of five workers who were victims of wage theft while employed at San Francisco-based Marina’s House Cleaning. The employees, who typically worked over 10 hours a day, will receive an average of $50,000 each in back pay.

The investigation opened last October after the Spanish-speaking workers visited the Labor Commissioner’s San Francisco office to learn about their rights under California’s labor laws. Investigators determined that the employees had been incorrectly designated as independent contractors and paid less than minimum wage with no overtime. They were required to clean 12 to 15 houses each day, which forced them to skip meal periods and rest breaks. Marina’s House Cleaning further failed to pay the employees’ full wages upon separation.

“With this settlement, workers who were once exploited and denied their right to a just day’s pay for a hard day’s work are finally getting the wages they earned,” said Labor Commissioner Julie A. Su.

The settlement includes $247,616 in back pay for the five workers and $17,384 in civil penalties.

Worker misclassification results in an estimated loss of $7 billion each year in payroll tax revenue to the State. Also, Employees misclassified as independent contractors are frequently underpaid and do not have on-the-job benefits and protections including workers’ compensation coverage, family leave, unemployment insurance, the right to organize or join a union, and protection against employer retaliation.

“Employers who knowingly misclassify workers as independent contractors commit wage theft, deprive their employees of basic rights and gain an unfair competitive advantage over businesses that abide by the law,” said Labor Commissioner Su.

The Wage Theft is a Crime public awareness campaign, launched in 2014 by the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) and its Labor Commissioner’s Office, has helped inform workers of their rights and employers of their responsibilities. The campaign includes multilingual print and outdoor advertising as well as radio commercials in Spanish, Chinese, Vietnamese, Hmong and Tagalog.

San Jose Minimum Wage Not Going Up In 2016 Due To Consumer Price Index Drop

SAN JOSE (KPIX 5) – Thousands of people who in San Jose who earn minimum wage thought they would be getting a raise on January 1st. But a lower Consumer Price Index means their wages will stay at $10.30 an hour next year.
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Emma Sanchez is among those earning minimum wage in San Jose. When asked how she tries to make ends meet, Sanchez said, “Stretch it out. It’s really hard.”

The mother of four said she is sometimes unable to pay her bills. “It’s , extra hours extra shifts,” Sanchez said. “You know, pulling ends here and there to do what you got to do just to make ends meet.”

San Jose voters passed an ordinance two years ago that allows for a jump in minimum wage if the Price Index goes up. But in the last 12 months, the CPI went down, because gas prices took a drop in August.

Although Sanchez lives in one of the most expensive cities in the country, the CPI is a U.S. city average.

“It’s not fair,” Sanchez said. “It’s getting harder and harder and minimum wage is not going to cut it anymore.”

Mayor Sam Liccardo said, “The mechanical of the existing ordinance is not helping.”

Liccardo said he wants to see an increase in minimum wage throughout Santa Clara County.

“There’s no question that the minimum wage at its current level is not enough to enable anyone to survive in this valley,” the mayor told KPIX 5.

For thousands like Sanchez, every penny counts when you’re making minimum wage. She said any increase in pay would help.

“It would help. It would extremely help not only me as a single mother but a lot of people it would help,” Sanchez said.

This is the first time since the ordinance was passed that the minimum wage has not gone up.

ORIGINALLY POSTED BY CBS SAN FRANCISCO

Labor Commissioner Awards $138,386 to Caregiver Who Worked Round-the-Clock for Less Than Minimum Wage

San Francisco—California Labor Commissioner Julie A. Su awarded $138,386 in back pay to a caregiver who worked 16-hour days in San Francisco for less than minimum wage, usually without a day off. The amount includes minimum wage and severance pay violations, liquidated damages and waiting time penalties.

Francisca Vasquez, a Salvadoran war refugee, was hired in 1992 by siblings Magdalena Lindvall and Reynaldo Peña Jr. to work as a companion to their elderly parents for $400 a month. Eventually Vasquez became a housekeeper and then round-the-clock caregiver to their mother for $500 a month. Upon the mother’s death, Vasquez was discharged.

“Workers are not always aware of their rights,” said Christine Baker, Director of the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR). “California labor law protects domestic workers as well as others who work in industries susceptible to wage theft.” The Labor Commissioner’s Office, also known as the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement (DLSE), is a division within DIR.

Because Vasquez filed her claim two years into the three year statute of limitation for minimum wage claims, she could only collect wages on the last year she worked.

“This was an egregious case of worker abuse, where someone providing care was treated with an utter lack of care for her rights and for her humanity,” said Labor Commissioner Julie A. Su. “I am pleased that through the Berman wage claim process, my office was able to help her get some of the hard earned wages she deserved. This is a sign that when workers come forward to file wage claims, they can win some measure of justice.”

The Labor Commissioner awarded her $50,008 for wages, $48,209 in liquidated damages, $35,707 in  interest, and $4,464 in penalties.

Vasquez was assisted in the wage claim process by the community organization Mujeres Unidas y Activas and the Legal Aid Society–Employment Law Center.

The Labor Commissioner’s Office inspects workplaces for wage and hour violations, adjudicates wage claims, enforces prevailing wage rates and apprenticeship standards in public works projects, investigates retaliation and whistleblower complaints, issues licenses and registrations for businesses, and educates the public on labor laws. Updated information on California labor laws is available online.

The Wage Theft is a Crime public awareness campaign, launched last year by DIR and its Labor Commissioner’s Office, has helped inform workers of their rights. The campaign includes multilingual print and outdoor advertising as well as radio commercials on ethnic stations in English, Spanish, Chinese, Vietnamese, Hmong and Tagalog.

Employees with work-related questions or complaints may call the toll-free California Workers’ Information Line at (866) 924-9757 for recorded information in Spanish and English on a variety of work-related topics. Members of the press may contact Erika Monterroza at (510) 286-1164 or Peter Melton at (510) 286-7046 for more information.

This article was originally published by DIR.CA.GOV.

All in One Poster Company located in Buena Park, California is a leading provider of state and federal labor law posters as well as OSHA safety posters in the country.