Cal/OSHA Reminds Employers to Protect Outdoor Workers from Heat Illness as Temperatures Rise Statewide

AIO Heat Stress 2018 (WordPress blog)

Our California Outdoor Heat Illness Prevention Poster is on sale for the entire Summer of 2018 saving you 15% of our already low prices. Take advantage of this offer now by using coupon code HEAT2018 upon checkout.

Cal/OSHA is reminding all employers to protect their outdoor workers from heat illness and to encourage their workers to take preventative cool-down breaks in the shade as temperatures rise throughout California. The National Weather Service has issued excessive heat warnings for forecasts of triple-digit temperatures through the weekend, starting Thursday, June 21st, in Southern California and beginning Friday in central and northern counties. Summer has officially begun.

“During heat waves, employers must closely observe their employees for signs and symptoms of heat illness,” said Cal/OSHA Chief Juliann Sum. “As always, workers should be encouraged to drink water frequently and take preventative cool-down rest breaks in the shade when they feel the need to do so.”

To help employers comply with the state’s Heat Illness Prevention Regulation, All In One Poster Company has designed a comprehensive poster to supplement the Cal/OSHA standard training requirement and the employer’s Injury and Illness Prevention Program (IIPP), and to serve as a quick reference guide. Remember that displaying posters is a sign of your commitment to safety.

CAHeatStress2015

This poster contains the following information:

  • Steps to Preventing Heat Stress according to Cal/OSHA
  • Symptoms of Heat Exhaustion
  • Symptoms of Heat Stroke
  • What to do for Heat-Related Illness

California’s heat illness prevention regulation requires employers with outdoor workers to take the following four steps to prevent heat illness:

  • Plan – Develop and implement an effective written heat illness prevention plan that includes emergency response procedures.
  • Training – Train all employees and supervisors on heat illness prevention.
  • Water – Provide drinking water that is fresh, pure, suitably cool and free of charge so that each worker can drink at least 1 quart per hour, and encourage workers to do so.
  • Shade – Provide shade when workers request it and when temperatures exceed 80 degrees. Encourage workers to take a cool-down rest in the shade for at least five minutes. They should not wait until they feel sick to cool down.

Cal/OSHA urges workers experiencing possible overheating to take a preventative cool-down rest in the shade until symptoms are gone. Workers who have existing health problems or medical conditions that reduce tolerance to heat, such as diabetes, need to be extra vigilant. Some high blood pressure and anti-inflammatory medications can also increase a worker’s risk for heat illness.

In addition to the other requirements outlined in California’s heat illness prevention regulation, it is crucial that supervisors are effectively trained on emergency procedures in case a worker does get sick. This helps ensure sick employees receive treatment immediately and that the symptoms do not develop into a serious illness or death.

Cal/OSHA’s Heat Illness Prevention special emphasis program, the first of its kind in the nation, includes enforcement of heat regulations as well as multilingual outreach and training programs for California’s employers and workers. Online information on heat illness prevention requirements and training materials are available on Cal/OSHA’s Heat Illness Prevention web page and the Water. Rest. Shade. campaign site. A Heat Illness Prevention e-tool is also available on Cal/OSHA’s website.

For indoor workers in California, All In One Posters has also put together a California Indoor Heat Stress Poster seen below. This poster was created in response to a bill that was signed by Governor Brown in which section 6720 was added to SB 1167 to add protection for indoor workers against indoor heat.

All in One Posters - California Heat Illness Prevention for Indoor Working Environments

On-the-job heat exposure is a risk during operations involving high air temperatures, radiant heat sources, high humidity, direct physical contact with hot objects, or strenuous physical activities. Affected workplaces may include foundries, brick-firing and ceramic plants, glass products facilities, rubber products plants, electric utilities, commercial kitchens, laundries, chemical plants, and smelters.

OSHA emphasizes that while thousands of workers become sick each year from occupational heat exposure, the illnesses and deaths that can result are preventable.

All in One Poster Company designed the California Heat Illness Prevention for Indoor Work Environments to address this problem. Our poster contains steps to prevent heat illness, types of heat illnesses and treatments, and steps that both employees and employers can take to address this issue and create a plan of action.

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Rhode Island Earned Paid Sick Leave Law Effective July 1

Effective July 1, Rhode Island employers generally must provide paid or unpaid earned sick leave to each employee, depending on employer size. The following chart summarizes the law and its requirements.

Which Employees and Employers Are Covered? All employers and paid employees.
Must an Employer Compensate Sick Leave? Yes. Employers with 18 or more employees must provide paid sick leave, while employers with fewer than 18 employees may provide unpaid sick leave.
How Much Sick Leave May an Employee Accrue and Use?
  • 24 hours in 2018
  • 32 hours in 2019
  • 40 hours in 2020
How Does an Employee Accrue Sick Leave? For every 35 hours worked or paid, employees generally accrue 1 hour of sick leave.
When Can Employees Begin Accruing and Using Sick Leave? Immediately. However, an employer may impose a 90-day waiting period on newly hired employees if they are notified of it in writing upon hire.
Which Life Events Qualify for Sick Leave?
  • Mental or physical illness, injury, or health condition.
  • A need for medical diagnosis, care, or treatment of a mental or physical illness, injury, or health condition.
  • A need for preventive medical care.
  • A need to care for a family member with a mental or physical illness, injury, or health condition.

Additional requirements and exceptions applyClick here to read the law and its regulations.

With regards to posting requirements, the poster associated with this law is called the Healthy and Safe Families and Workplaces Act which has already been included in our Rhode Island and Federal Combination Poster as of April 2, 2018.

Minimum Wage Increases Effective July 1

Minimium Wage July 2018

Minimum Wage Rates Effective July 1, 2018. This is NOT an exhaustive list, and is used for illustration purposes only.

Effective July 1, 2018, the minimum wage will increase in the following states and localities as follows:

  • Maryland: $10.10 per hour
  • Oregon: $10.75 per hour ($12.00 per hour in the Portland metropolitan area;
    $10.50 per hour in nonurban counties)
  • District of Columbia (DC): $13.25 per hour
  • Los Angeles, CA: $13.25 per hour for employers with 26 or more employees;                                             $12.00 per hour for employers with 25 or fewer employees
  • Chicago, IL: $12.00 per hour
  • Cook County, IL: $11.00 per hour
  • San Francisco, CA: $15.00 per hour
  • Minneapolis, MN: $11.25 per hour for employers with 100 or more employees;                                           $10.25 per hour for employers with 100 or fewer employees
  • Belmont, CA: $12.50 per hour
  • Emeryville, CA: $15.00 per hour
  • Malibu, CA: $13.25 per hour for employers with 26 or more employees;
    $12.00 per hour for employers with 25 or fewer employees
  • Milpitas, CA: $13.50 per hour
  • Pasadena, CA: $13.25 per hour for employers with 26 or more employees;
    $12.00 per hour for employers with 25 or fewer employees
  • San Leandro, CA: $13.00 per hour
  • Montgomery County, MD:
    • $12.25 per hour for employers with 51 or more employees;
    • $12.00 per hour for employers with 2-50 employees

Additional minimum wage rates may apply for tipped employees and in metropolitan areas. Be sure to comply with any local wage requirements that apply to your business. Updated posters can be found here: http://www.allinoneposters.com/Specific-City-and-Industry-Notices

*Some posters may not yet be available (such as Montgomery County Maryland as of June 19, 2018)

U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL’s) model health insurance marketplace notice forms available here

Effective Dates Extended for Model Exchange Notices

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Employee Benefits Security Administration has extended the effective date of its model health insurance exchange notices through March 31, 2020, including:

Under the Affordable Care Act, employers are required to provide all new hires with a written notice about the ACA’s health insurance exchanges, which are also known as marketplaces. Employers must provide the exchange notice to each employee, regardless of plan enrollment status or of part-time or full-time status. The DOL considers a notice to be provided “at the time of hiring” if the notice was provided within 14 days of an employee’s start date.

Form I-9 Audits Up Dramatically Since October

I-9 Fines from 2009 to 2017

Fines as a result of I-9 audits are dramatically up the past year.

From October 1, 2017-May 4, 2018, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) conducted 2,282 Form I-9 audits, up from 1,360 audits from October 1, 2016-September 30, 2017. Given this dramatic increase, employers should take a moment to ensure that their Form I-9 compliance practices meet federal requirements. Businesses that fail to comply with these requirements are subject to penalties of up to $2,236 per violation.

4 Quick Form I-9 Compliance Tips

  1. All U.S. employers generally must fill out and keep a Form I-9 for every person they hire for employment in the United States, as long as the person works for pay or other benefits.
  2. Newly hired employees must complete and sign Section 1 of Form I-9 no later than the first day of employment.
  3. An employee must present to the employer an original document or documents that show his or her identity and employment authorization within 3 business days of the date employment begins.
  4. Employers must retain an employee’s completed Form I-9 for as long as the individual works for the employer. However, Form I-9 does not need to be filed with any federal agency.

Posted by HR360

$15 Per Hour is here. Updated San Francisco Employment Poster for July 1, 2018 Now Available.

Our City of San Francisco Ordinances Poster has been updated with the latest change to the San Francisco Minimum Wage, which will be $15/hour as of July 1, 2018.

In addition, our poster also now includes the new Salary History Ordinance. The ordinance  bans employers, including City contractors and subcontractors, from considering current or past salary of an applicant in determining whether to hire the applicant or what salary to offer the applicant.

The ordinance also prohibits employers from (1) asking applicants about their current or past salary or (2) disclosing a current or former employee’s salary history without that employee’s authorization unless the salary history is publicly available.

Posters purchased on or after June 1st 2018 will have these changes included.

The poster is available in a regular version, as well as a city-contractor version for companies that hold contracts with the city/county of San Francisco.

You may click on the image below to purchase your poster. Thank you for your business.

2018 San Francisco City Poster

Connecticut Adopts Salary History Inquiry Ban

New CT Law Effective January 1, 2019

Effective January 1, 2019, a new law generally prohibits Connecticut employers from inquiring about a prospective employee’s wage and salary history unless it is voluntarily disclosed. Notably, the law does not prohibit an employer from inquiring about other elements of a prospective employee’s compensation structure as long as such employer does not inquire about the value of the elements of such compensation structure.

Click here to read the law.

Posted by HR360

Santa Fe New Mexico Increased Minimum Wage Rates Currently In Effect

Increased Rates Currently in Effect

The minimum wage rate for the City of Santa Fe, New Mexico has increased to $11.40 per hour as of March 1st 2018. Additionally, the minimum wage rate for Santa Fe County has increased to $11.40 per hour ($3.41 per hour for tipped employees). These increased rates are currently in effect.

Who Is Required To Pay Santa Fe City Living Wage:

  • The City to all full-time permanent workers employed by the City;
  • Contractors for the City, that have a contract requiring the performance of a service but excluding purchases of goods;
  • Businesses receiving assistance relating to economic development in the form of grants, subsidies, loan guarantees or industrial revenue bonds in excess of twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000) for the duration of the City grant or subsidy;
  • Businesses required to have a business license or registration from the City; and
  • Nonprofit organizations, except for those whose primary source of funds is from Medicaid waivers.
  • For workers who customarily receive more than one hundred dollars ($100) per month in tips or commissions, any tips or commissions received and retained by a worker shall be counted as wages and credited towards satisfaction of the Living Wage provided that, for tipped workers, all tips received by such workers are retained by the workers, except that the pooling of tips among workers shall be permitted.

Who Is Required To Pay Santa Fe County Minimum Wage:
All employees of these affected businesses whether employed on a full-time, part-time or temporary basis, including contingent or contracted workers and those working through a temporary service or an employment agency.

  • For businesses located throughout Santa Fe County, outside of the incorporated boundaries of the City of Santa Fe, City of Española and the Town of Edgewood.
  • Businesses required by Santa Fe County to have a business license.
  • Santa Fe County government
  • Contractors that enter into a contract after April 26, 2014 with Santa Fe County government for services, including construction services.
  • Businesses who undertake an economic development project and execute a project participation agreement with Santa Fe County.

Posting Requirement:

You may download the required notices from our Specific City and Industry Notices Page.

New Expiration Date for Several Model FMLA Notices is June 30, 2018

Model Notices Previously Expired on May 31, 2018

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division (WHD) has extended the effective date of the following model FMLA notices through June 30, 2018:

Previously, these model notices expired on May 31, 2018. No other changes have been made to these notices besides their effective date.

For further guidance regarding these notices, please contact the WHD directly at 1-866-487-2365.

Posted by HR360

California July 2018 Labor Law Updates

With ever-changing labor law posting requirements, and with the constant addition of new local ordinances that also require posters, we understand the difficulty in keeping up with the trend. For your convenience, All In One Posters has dedicated a page on our website that lists some of the major additional required notices arranged by state. Some are available for purchase, but most are downloadable at no cost to you. Click on the link below for further details:

http://www.allinoneposters.com/Specific-City-and-Industry-Notices *

*Updated with the latest changes that will take effect July 1st 2018 for certain California localities.