Are you ready to stay in compliance?

Preorder your labor law posters now to comply with the 2019 new regulations. Below is a list of the state updates:

STATE NOTICE Revision
AK Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $9.84 to $9.89 effective January 1, 2019.
AR Minimum Wage
AZ Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $10.50 to $11.00 effective January 1, 2019.
CA Family Care and Medical Leave and Pregnancy Disability Leave The DFEH is considering changes to the CFRA Act to add New Parental Leave Act.
Discrimination and Harassment SB 1343 requires employers with five or more employees to provide antiharassment training to
nonsupervisory employees as well as supervisors. Previously the training requirement applied to
employers with at least 50 employees,
Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $10.50 to $11 for 1-25 employees and $11 to $12 for 26+ employees effective January 1, 2019.
IWC Wage Orders (Separate Poster) The Wage Orders will be updated to reflect the new minimum wage rate.
CO Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $10.20 to $11.10 effective January 1, 2019.
DE Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $8.25 to $8.75 effective January 1, 2019.
FL Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $8.25to $8.46 effective January 1, 2019.
HI Discrimination SB 2351 amends Hawaii’s discrimination statute to prohibit employers from asking applicants about salary history.
IL ISERRA Illinois Service Member Employment & Reemployment Rights Act which “clarifies and strengthens” existing laws to ensure
service members’ employment and rights protection while fulfilling military requirements.
LA Earned Income Credit The income limit information will be updated for 2019.
MA Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $11 to $12 effective January 1, 2019.
ME Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $10 to $11 effective January 1, 2019.
MI Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $9.25 to $10 effective January 1, 2019.
MN Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $8.31 to $9.30 effective January 1, 2019.
MO Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $7.85 to $8.60 effective January 1, 2019.
MT Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $8.30 to $8.50 effective January 1, 2019.
NE Unemployment Changes to the state’s Unemployment Insurance law may bring a mandatory poster change.
NJ Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $8.60 to $8.85 effective January 1, 2019.
NY Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $10.40 to $11.10 effective December 31, 2018.
OH Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $8.30 to $8.55 effective January 1, 2019.
RI Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $10.10 to $10.50 effective January 1, 2019.
SD Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $8.85 to $9.10 effective January 1, 2019.
VT Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $10.50 to $10.78 effective January 1, 2019.
WA Minimum Wage Minimum wage goes up from $11.50 to $12 effective January 1, 2019.

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Cal/OSHA Emergency Regulation Approved: Certain Employers Must Electronically Submit Form 300A on Occupational Injuries and Illnesses

News Release No.: 2018-90                                             Date: November 6, 2018

Oakland—Cal/OSHA’s emergency regulations requiring certain employers in California to electronically submit each year their Form 300A summaries of work-related injuries and illnesses to federal OSHA have been approved by the Office of Administrative Law (OAL).

The following employers must submit online the Form 300A covering calendar year 2017 by December 31, 2018:

  • All employers with 250 or more employees, unless specifically exempted by section 2 of Title 8 of the California Code of Regulations.
  • Employers with 20 to 249 employees in the specific industries listed in Appendix H of the emergency regulations.

Employers described above that are now required to submit their 300A summaries online each year should follow the instructions on federal OSHA’s Injury Tracking Application webpage.

Cal/OSHA will proceed with the formal rulemaking process to make the emergency regulations permanent by submitting the required documentation to OAL. The rulemaking process will include a public comment period and public hearing. The dates for the comment period and public hearing will be posted on Cal/OSHA’s proposed regulation page.

The California Division of Occupational Safety and Health, or Cal/OSHA, is the division within the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) that helps protect California’s workers from health and safety hazards on the job in almost every workplace.

Cal/OSHA’s Consultation Services Branch provides free and voluntary assistance to employers to improve their safety and health programs. Employers should call (800) 963-9424 for assistance from Cal/OSHA Consultation Services.

Employees with work-related questions or complaints may contact DIR’s Call Center in English or Spanish at 844-LABOR-DIR (844-522-6734). Complaints can also be filed confidentially with Cal/OSHA district offices.

 

ORIGINALLY POSTED BY DIR. CA.GOV

PREORDER YOUR 2019 LABOR LAW POSTERS

All In One Poster Company will begin taking pre-orders for 2019 labor law posters starting today, November 1st, 2018.

Orders placed on or after November 1st will automatically be on hold. Actual poster shipment will vary by state and can range between December to January based on when the state releases the update.

Our State & Federal Combination poster consists of both State aNew York 2006 FedOSHAnd Federal required notices with the exception of specific industries/cities notices which you can purchase separately. You may opt to purchase the Stand Alone posters which does not include any replacement poster for future updates or you may purchase our subscription plans.

Our State and Federal Combination Poster Subscription Plan was developed to cater to time-constrained Human Resource professionals interested in hassle-free compliance good for one, two or three years. During the entirety of the subscription plan, companies and individuals will automatically receive a BRAND NEW updated Combination Poster (not a sticker, printout, or email) when a mandatory change occurs in either the State or Federal laws. Only the initial shipping cost is billed to you whether you choos

e to go with a 1, 2 or 3 year program, which makes the 3-year option the most cost effective. The plan will commence on the date of purchase and will expire exactly 1, 2, or 3 years from that date.

Enrollment in our Compliance Program subscription

plans works like insurance. It is a prepaid plan. We cannot guarantee that mandatory changes will occur within the duration of any enrollment period, but the plan does guarantee that you receive a replacement poster when they do occur, regardless of how often they occur. Absolutely no refunds will be given after 30 days of purchase.

The pricing you see is for one (1) poster + compliance program only. The pricing is already inclusive of the initial poster. There is no need to purchase a separate standalone poster. If you require a Spanish version, you will need to purchase this separately.

If you are a Federal Contractor, we also offer posters with your additional posting requirements. Our Federal Contractor Package is a 2 part-poster panel that was created especially for Federal Contractors and Sub-Contractors to fulfill compliance posting requirements for both the State and Federal laws

Contact us to purchase your compliance posters at 714-521-7720 or you may go to our website at www.allinoneposters.com

 

Cal/OSHA Notice on Emergency Regulation for Electronic Submission of Form 300A on Occupational Injuries and Illnesses

Oakland—Cal/OSHA on October 18 issued a notice of emergency regulation that would require certain employers to electronically submit their summary of recordable work-related injuries and illnesses covering calendar year 2017 to federal OSHA by December 31, 2018.

Businesses operating in California that would be required to submit the Cal/OSHA Form 300A online include all employers with 250 or more employees, unless specifically exempted by section 14300.2 of Title 8 of the California Code of Regulations, and employers with 20 to 249 employees in the specific industries listed on page 8 of the emergency regulation’s proposed text.

Cal/OSHA submitted the emergency regulation amending recordkeeping sections 14300.35 and 14300.41 of Title 8 of the California Code of Regulations to the Office of Administrative Law (OAL) on October 25. Interested persons have until October 30 to submit comments on the proposed emergency regulation. OAL will have until November 5 to review and adopt or deny the proposed regulation.

The California Division of Occupational Safety and Health, or Cal/OSHA, is the division within the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) that helps protect California’s workers from health and safety hazards on the job in almost every workplace.

Cal/OSHA’s Consultation Services Branch provides free and voluntary assistance to employers to improve their safety and health programs. Employers should call (800) 963-9424 for assistance from Cal/OSHA Consultation Services.

Employees with work-related questions or complaints may contact DIR’s Call Center in English or Spanish at 844-LABOR-DIR (844-522-6734). Complaints can also be filed confidentially with Cal/OSHA district offices.

 

ORIGINALLY POSTED BY DIR.CA.GOV

Safety Summit Held to Reduce Trenching Fatalities

trenchingEvery year, more than 50 workers die in trench-related incidents and thousands more are injured. OSHA and the North American Excavation Shoring Association recently hosted the Colorado Trench Safety Summit to raise awareness of hazards and best practices. More than 500 attendees participated in training and demonstrations, including a mock trench rescue by local first responders. OSHA also shared compliance assistance resources to help keep workers safe from trenching hazards.

Originally posted from DOL.GOV

All In One Poster Company offers a safety poster for Trenching Excavation!!TrenchingSafety-ENG

 

 

Cal/OSHA Produces Fact Sheet, Poster for Preventing Work-Related Injuries to Housekeeping Workers

Oakland—Cal/OSHA has produced a fact sheet and poster to help employers in the hotel and lodging industry comply with a new regulation to prevent work-related injuries suffered by housekeeping workers. The Hotel Housekeeping Musculoskeletal Injury Prevention regulation went into effect July 1 and requires employers to complete an initial worksite evaluation by October 1 to identify and address housekeeping worker hazards.

The Safety and Health Fact Sheet provides an overview of the workplace health and Preventing Musculoskeletal Injuries in Housekeepers postersafety requirements that reduce the risk of musculoskeletal injuries and disorders common among housekeepers. Employers are also encouraged to post the Preventing Musculoskeletal Injuries in Housekeepers poster in a place accessible to all housekeeping workers. The poster includes information on the causes of musculoskeletal injuries, the employer’s responsibility to have an effective program to control the risk of musculoskeletal injuries, and employees’ rights.

“We created these guidance materials to help workers know their rights and employers their responsibilities to comply with this standard,” said Cal/OSHA Chief Juliann Sum. “In addition, Cal/OSHA Consultation Services are available to assist employers and employees who have questions or need more information.”

The employer’s housekeeping safety program must include the following:

  • Procedures to identify and evaluate housekeeping hazards through worksite evaluations
  • Procedures to investigate musculoskeletal injuries to housekeepers
  • Methods to correct identified hazards
  • Employee and supervisor training on safe work practices and on the process for early reporting of injuries to the employer
  • Procedures to involve employees and their union representative in worksite evaluations, injury investigations, and evaluation of corrective measures

A musculoskeletal injury is caused by a single traumatic event, such as slip, trip or fall, or by repeated exposure over weeks, months or years to repetitive motion, force, vibration or awkward positions caused by daily tasks such as lifting heavy furniture and equipment, pulling linens and pushing carts.

In 2012, hotel worker representatives presented a petition to the Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board requesting a new standard to control the hazards faced by hotel housekeepers. Cal/OSHA convened public advisory meetings over a three-year period to gather information, and determined that existing regulations did not adequately address the hazards faced by housekeepers. Dozens of workers spoke at the meetings, sharing their experiences and discussing how their injuries impacted their lives at work and at home.

The California Division of Occupational Safety and Health, or Cal/OSHA, is the division within the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) that helps protect California’s workers from health and safety hazards on the job in almost every workplace.

Hotel and lodging industry employers are encouraged to contact Cal/OSHA’s Consultation Services Branch for free on-site or telephone consultations. Consultation Services assist employers in developing and maintaining workplace safety and health programs pursuant to Cal/OSHA’s regulations. Employers and employees can call (800) 963-9424 for assistance from Cal/OSHA Consultation Services.

Employees with work-related questions or complaints may contact DIR’s Call Center in English or Spanish at 844-LABOR-DIR (844-522-6734). Complaints can also be filed confidentially with Cal/OSHA district offices.

 

 

ORIGINALLY POSTED BY DIR

U.S. Department of Labor Cites Excavating Company Following Fatal Trench Collapse

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) cited JK Excavating & Utilities Inc. after an employee suffered fatal injuries in a trench collapse. OSHA has proposed penalties of $202,201, and placed the company in its Severe Violator Enforcement Program.

OSHA investigators determined that employees at a residential construction site in Morrow, Ohio, were working in trenches up to 16-feet deep without adequate cave-in protection. OSHA cited the company for failing to use protective systems to prevent a cave-in; implement methods to remove accumulating water; properly use ladders to enter and exit the trench; prevent employees from working beneath a suspended trench box; ensure employees wore hard hats; and make provisions for prompt medical attention in the event of injury.

“A trench can collapse in seconds, burying workers under the weight of thousands of pounds of soil,” said Ken Montgomery, OSHA Cincinnati Area Office Director. “This tragedy was preventable, and could have been avoided if the employer had installed required protective systems to prevent a trench cave-in.”

The company has 15 business days from receipt of its citations and penalties to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA’s area director, or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit https://www.osha.gov.

All In One Poster Company offers the following poster with regards to Trenching.

TrenchingSafety-ENG

Cal/OSHA Reminds Employers to Protect Outdoor Workers from Heat Illness as Temperatures Rise Statewide

AIO Heat Stress 2018 (WordPress blog)

Our California Outdoor Heat Illness Prevention Poster is on sale for the entire Summer of 2018 saving you 15% of our already low prices. Take advantage of this offer now by using coupon code HEAT2018 upon checkout.

Cal/OSHA is reminding all employers to protect their outdoor workers from heat illness and to encourage their workers to take preventative cool-down breaks in the shade as temperatures rise throughout California. The National Weather Service has issued excessive heat warnings for forecasts of triple-digit temperatures through the weekend, starting Thursday, June 21st, in Southern California and beginning Friday in central and northern counties. Summer has officially begun.

“During heat waves, employers must closely observe their employees for signs and symptoms of heat illness,” said Cal/OSHA Chief Juliann Sum. “As always, workers should be encouraged to drink water frequently and take preventative cool-down rest breaks in the shade when they feel the need to do so.”

To help employers comply with the state’s Heat Illness Prevention Regulation, All In One Poster Company has designed a comprehensive poster to supplement the Cal/OSHA standard training requirement and the employer’s Injury and Illness Prevention Program (IIPP), and to serve as a quick reference guide. Remember that displaying posters is a sign of your commitment to safety.

CAHeatStress2015

This poster contains the following information:

  • Steps to Preventing Heat Stress according to Cal/OSHA
  • Symptoms of Heat Exhaustion
  • Symptoms of Heat Stroke
  • What to do for Heat-Related Illness

California’s heat illness prevention regulation requires employers with outdoor workers to take the following four steps to prevent heat illness:

  • Plan – Develop and implement an effective written heat illness prevention plan that includes emergency response procedures.
  • Training – Train all employees and supervisors on heat illness prevention.
  • Water – Provide drinking water that is fresh, pure, suitably cool and free of charge so that each worker can drink at least 1 quart per hour, and encourage workers to do so.
  • Shade – Provide shade when workers request it and when temperatures exceed 80 degrees. Encourage workers to take a cool-down rest in the shade for at least five minutes. They should not wait until they feel sick to cool down.

Cal/OSHA urges workers experiencing possible overheating to take a preventative cool-down rest in the shade until symptoms are gone. Workers who have existing health problems or medical conditions that reduce tolerance to heat, such as diabetes, need to be extra vigilant. Some high blood pressure and anti-inflammatory medications can also increase a worker’s risk for heat illness.

In addition to the other requirements outlined in California’s heat illness prevention regulation, it is crucial that supervisors are effectively trained on emergency procedures in case a worker does get sick. This helps ensure sick employees receive treatment immediately and that the symptoms do not develop into a serious illness or death.

Cal/OSHA’s Heat Illness Prevention special emphasis program, the first of its kind in the nation, includes enforcement of heat regulations as well as multilingual outreach and training programs for California’s employers and workers. Online information on heat illness prevention requirements and training materials are available on Cal/OSHA’s Heat Illness Prevention web page and the Water. Rest. Shade. campaign site. A Heat Illness Prevention e-tool is also available on Cal/OSHA’s website.

For indoor workers in California, All In One Posters has also put together a California Indoor Heat Stress Poster seen below. This poster was created in response to a bill that was signed by Governor Brown in which section 6720 was added to SB 1167 to add protection for indoor workers against indoor heat.

All in One Posters - California Heat Illness Prevention for Indoor Working Environments

On-the-job heat exposure is a risk during operations involving high air temperatures, radiant heat sources, high humidity, direct physical contact with hot objects, or strenuous physical activities. Affected workplaces may include foundries, brick-firing and ceramic plants, glass products facilities, rubber products plants, electric utilities, commercial kitchens, laundries, chemical plants, and smelters.

OSHA emphasizes that while thousands of workers become sick each year from occupational heat exposure, the illnesses and deaths that can result are preventable.

All in One Poster Company designed the California Heat Illness Prevention for Indoor Work Environments to address this problem. Our poster contains steps to prevent heat illness, types of heat illnesses and treatments, and steps that both employees and employers can take to address this issue and create a plan of action.

Rhode Island Earned Paid Sick Leave Law Effective July 1

Effective July 1, Rhode Island employers generally must provide paid or unpaid earned sick leave to each employee, depending on employer size. The following chart summarizes the law and its requirements.

Which Employees and Employers Are Covered? All employers and paid employees.
Must an Employer Compensate Sick Leave? Yes. Employers with 18 or more employees must provide paid sick leave, while employers with fewer than 18 employees may provide unpaid sick leave.
How Much Sick Leave May an Employee Accrue and Use?
  • 24 hours in 2018
  • 32 hours in 2019
  • 40 hours in 2020
How Does an Employee Accrue Sick Leave? For every 35 hours worked or paid, employees generally accrue 1 hour of sick leave.
When Can Employees Begin Accruing and Using Sick Leave? Immediately. However, an employer may impose a 90-day waiting period on newly hired employees if they are notified of it in writing upon hire.
Which Life Events Qualify for Sick Leave?
  • Mental or physical illness, injury, or health condition.
  • A need for medical diagnosis, care, or treatment of a mental or physical illness, injury, or health condition.
  • A need for preventive medical care.
  • A need to care for a family member with a mental or physical illness, injury, or health condition.

Additional requirements and exceptions applyClick here to read the law and its regulations.

With regards to posting requirements, the poster associated with this law is called the Healthy and Safe Families and Workplaces Act which has already been included in our Rhode Island and Federal Combination Poster as of April 2, 2018.

Minimum Wage Increases Effective July 1

Minimium Wage July 2018

Minimum Wage Rates Effective July 1, 2018. This is NOT an exhaustive list, and is used for illustration purposes only.

Effective July 1, 2018, the minimum wage will increase in the following states and localities as follows. To access the actual posting requirements for each municipal or local requirement, CLICK HERE, then click on your state.

  • Maryland: $10.10 per hour (Already included in our 2018 combo poster)
  • Oregon: $10.75 per hour (Already included in our combination poster as of April 2nd 2018)
    ($12.00 per hour in the Portland metropolitan area;
    $10.50 per hour in nonurban counties)
  • District of Columbia (DC): $13.25 per hour (Already included in our 2018 combo poster)
  • Los Angeles, CA: $13.25 per hour for employers with 26 or more employees;                                             $12.00 per hour for employers with 25 or fewer employees
  • Chicago, IL: $12.00 per hour
  • Cook County, IL: $11.00 per hour
  • San Francisco, CA: $15.00 per hour
  • Minneapolis, MN: $11.25 per hour for employers with 100 or more employees;                                           $10.25 per hour for employers with 100 or fewer employees
  • Belmont, CA: $12.50 per hour
  • Emeryville, CA: $15.00 per hour
  • Malibu, CA: $13.25 per hour for employers with 26 or more employees;
    $12.00 per hour for employers with 25 or fewer employees
  • Milpitas, CA: $13.50 per hour
  • Pasadena, CA: $13.25 per hour for employers with 26 or more employees;
    $12.00 per hour for employers with 25 or fewer employees
  • San Leandro, CA: $13.00 per hour
  • Montgomery County, MD:
    • $12.25 per hour for employers with 51 or more employees;
    • $12.00 per hour for employers with 2-50 employees

Additional minimum wage rates may apply for tipped employees and in metropolitan areas. Be sure to comply with any local wage requirements that apply to your business. Updated local and municipal posters can be found here: http://www.allinoneposters.com/Specific-City-and-Industry-Notices

*Some posters may not yet be available (such as Montgomery County Maryland as of June 19, 2018)